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Title: Energy Conservation Code Decoded

Abstract

Designing an energy-efficient, affordable, and comfortable home is a lot easier thanks to a slime, easier to read booklet, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), published in March 2006. States, counties, and cities have begun reviewing the new code as a potential upgrade to their existing codes. Maintained under the public consensus process of the International Code Council, the IECC is designed to do just what its title says: promote the design and construction of energy-efficient homes and commercial buildings. Homes in this case means traditional single-family homes, duplexes, condominiums, and apartment buildings having three or fewer stories. The U.S. Department of Energy, which played a key role in proposing the changes that resulted in the new code, is offering a free training course that covers the residential provisions of the 2006 IECC.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
914688
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-49567
Journal ID: ISSN 0896-9442; HOENE2; BT0703000; TRN: US200812%%236
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Home Energy, 25(3):14; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; APARTMENT BUILDINGS; COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS; CONSTRUCTION; DESIGN; ENERGY CONSERVATION; TRAINING; Building Energy Codes Program; BECP; residential energy use; home energy use

Citation Formats

Cole, Pam C., and Taylor, Zachary T.. Energy Conservation Code Decoded. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Cole, Pam C., & Taylor, Zachary T.. Energy Conservation Code Decoded. United States.
Cole, Pam C., and Taylor, Zachary T.. 2006. "Energy Conservation Code Decoded". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_914688,
title = {Energy Conservation Code Decoded},
author = {Cole, Pam C. and Taylor, Zachary T.},
abstractNote = {Designing an energy-efficient, affordable, and comfortable home is a lot easier thanks to a slime, easier to read booklet, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), published in March 2006. States, counties, and cities have begun reviewing the new code as a potential upgrade to their existing codes. Maintained under the public consensus process of the International Code Council, the IECC is designed to do just what its title says: promote the design and construction of energy-efficient homes and commercial buildings. Homes in this case means traditional single-family homes, duplexes, condominiums, and apartment buildings having three or fewer stories. The U.S. Department of Energy, which played a key role in proposing the changes that resulted in the new code, is offering a free training course that covers the residential provisions of the 2006 IECC.},
doi = {},
journal = {Home Energy, 25(3):14},
number = 3,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month = 9
}
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