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Title: Energy Prices, Tariffs, Taxes and Subsidies in Ukraine

Abstract

For many years, electricity, gas and district heating tariffs for residential consumers were very low in Ukraine; until recently, they were even lower than in neighbouring countries such as Russia. The increases in gas and electricity tariffs, implemented in 2006, are an important step toward sustainable pricing levels; however, electricity and natural gas (especially for households) are still priced below the long-run marginal cost. The problem seems even more serious in district heating and nuclear power. According to the Ministry of Construction, district heating tariffs, on average, cover about 80% of costs. Current electricity prices do not fully include the capital costs of power stations, which are particularly high for nuclear power. Although the tariff for nuclear electricity generation includes a small decommissioning charge, it has not been sufficient to accumulate necessary funds for nuclear plants decommissioning.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
914667
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-55800
TRN: US200812%%225
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Prices and Taxes, (4th Quarter):xi - xxv; Journal Volume: 2006; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; CAPITALIZED COST; CONSTRUCTION; DECOMMISSIONING; DISTRICT HEATING; ELECTRICITY; FINANCIAL INCENTIVES; NATURAL GAS; NUCLEAR POWER; PRICES; TARIFFS; TAXES; UKRAINE

Citation Formats

Evans, Meredydd. Energy Prices, Tariffs, Taxes and Subsidies in Ukraine. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Evans, Meredydd. Energy Prices, Tariffs, Taxes and Subsidies in Ukraine. United States.
Evans, Meredydd. Sun . "Energy Prices, Tariffs, Taxes and Subsidies in Ukraine". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/914667.
@article{osti_914667,
title = {Energy Prices, Tariffs, Taxes and Subsidies in Ukraine},
author = {Evans, Meredydd},
abstractNote = {For many years, electricity, gas and district heating tariffs for residential consumers were very low in Ukraine; until recently, they were even lower than in neighbouring countries such as Russia. The increases in gas and electricity tariffs, implemented in 2006, are an important step toward sustainable pricing levels; however, electricity and natural gas (especially for households) are still priced below the long-run marginal cost. The problem seems even more serious in district heating and nuclear power. According to the Ministry of Construction, district heating tariffs, on average, cover about 80% of costs. Current electricity prices do not fully include the capital costs of power stations, which are particularly high for nuclear power. Although the tariff for nuclear electricity generation includes a small decommissioning charge, it has not been sufficient to accumulate necessary funds for nuclear plants decommissioning.},
doi = {},
journal = {Energy Prices and Taxes, (4th Quarter):xi - xxv},
number = 4,
volume = 2006,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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