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Title: ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL

Abstract

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues thatmore » are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley NationalLaboratory, Berkeley, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science
OSTI Identifier:
914501
Report Number(s):
LBNL/PUB-5519-(1)
R&D Project: 300142; BnR: YN0100000; TRN: US200809%%281
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99; ACCIDENTS; MANAGEMENT; MONITORING; PERFORMANCE; PERSONNEL; PRICES; PROCESSING; REPORTING REQUIREMENTS; RESOLUTION; SAFETY; US EPA; VALIDATION; LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

Citation Formats

Gravois, Melanie. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/914501.
Gravois, Melanie. ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL. United States. doi:10.2172/914501.
Gravois, Melanie. Wed . "ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL". United States. doi:10.2172/914501. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/914501.
@article{osti_914501,
title = {ISSUES MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANUAL},
author = {Gravois, Melanie},
abstractNote = {The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Issues Management Program encompasses the continuous monitoring of work programs, performance and safety to promptly identify issues to determine their risk and significance, their causes, and to identify and effectively implement corrective actions to ensure successful resolution and prevent the same or similar problems from occurring. This document describes the LBNL Issues Management Program and prescribes the process for issues identification, tracking, resolution, closure, validation, and effectiveness of corrective actions. Issues that are governed by this program include program and performance deficiencies or nonconformances that may be identified through employee discovery, internal or external oversight assessment findings, suggested process improvements and associated actions that require formal corrective action. Issues may also be identified in and/or may result in Root Cause Analysis (RCA) reports, Price Anderson Amendment Act (PAAA) reports, Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) reports, Accident Investigation reports, assessment reports, and External Oversight reports. The scope of these issues may include issues of both high and low significance as well as adverse conditions that meet the reporting requirements of the University of California (UC) Assurance Plan for LBNL or other reporting entities (e.g., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Energy). Issues that are found as a result of a walk-around or workspace inspection that can be immediately corrected or fixed are exempt from the requirements of this document.},
doi = {10.2172/914501},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed Jun 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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