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Title: Complementary Control by Additivies of the Kinetics of Amorphous CaCO3 Mineralization at an Organic Interface: In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Observations

Abstract

The kinetics of biomimetic mineralization at a fatty acid monolayer interface have been measured in situ by synchrotron x-ray reflectivity. The formation of biologically relevant amorphous calcium carbonate films is affected by soluble macromolecules, supersaturation rate of change, and Mg cations. We find that these solution conditions influence mineral film formation in a complementary fashion. Poly(sodium acrylate) extends the lifetime of metastable amorphous calcium carbonate, solution saturation controls the mineral film growth rate, and Mg cations create a longer induction time. This is the first quantification of potentially competitive biomineralization mechanisms that addresses nucleation and growth of the amorphous mineral phases, which are important in biomineralization.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
914410
Report Number(s):
BNL-78978-2007-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007; PRLTAO; TRN: US0802864
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phys. Rev. Lett.; Journal Volume: 97
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ADDITIVES; CALCIUM CARBONATES; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CATIONS; INDUCTION; KINETICS; LIFETIME; MINERALIZATION; NUCLEATION; REFLECTIVITY; SATURATION; SUPERSATURATION; SYNCHROTRONS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

DiMasi,E., Kwak, S., Amos, F., Olszta, M., Lush, D., and Gower, L. Complementary Control by Additivies of the Kinetics of Amorphous CaCO3 Mineralization at an Organic Interface: In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Observations. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.045503.
DiMasi,E., Kwak, S., Amos, F., Olszta, M., Lush, D., & Gower, L. Complementary Control by Additivies of the Kinetics of Amorphous CaCO3 Mineralization at an Organic Interface: In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Observations. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.045503.
DiMasi,E., Kwak, S., Amos, F., Olszta, M., Lush, D., and Gower, L. Sun . "Complementary Control by Additivies of the Kinetics of Amorphous CaCO3 Mineralization at an Organic Interface: In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Observations". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.045503.
@article{osti_914410,
title = {Complementary Control by Additivies of the Kinetics of Amorphous CaCO3 Mineralization at an Organic Interface: In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Observations},
author = {DiMasi,E. and Kwak, S. and Amos, F. and Olszta, M. and Lush, D. and Gower, L.},
abstractNote = {The kinetics of biomimetic mineralization at a fatty acid monolayer interface have been measured in situ by synchrotron x-ray reflectivity. The formation of biologically relevant amorphous calcium carbonate films is affected by soluble macromolecules, supersaturation rate of change, and Mg cations. We find that these solution conditions influence mineral film formation in a complementary fashion. Poly(sodium acrylate) extends the lifetime of metastable amorphous calcium carbonate, solution saturation controls the mineral film growth rate, and Mg cations create a longer induction time. This is the first quantification of potentially competitive biomineralization mechanisms that addresses nucleation and growth of the amorphous mineral phases, which are important in biomineralization.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.045503},
journal = {Phys. Rev. Lett.},
number = ,
volume = 97,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
  • The kinetics of biomimetic mineralization at a fatty acid monolayer interface have been measured in situ by synchrotron x-ray reflectivity. The formation of biologically relevant amorphous calcium carbonate films is affected by soluble macromolecules, supersaturation rate of change, and Mg cations. We find that these solution conditions influence mineral film formation in a complementary fashion. Poly(sodium acrylate) extends the lifetime of metastable amorphous calcium carbonate, solution saturation controls the mineral film growth rate, and Mg cations create a longer induction time. This is the first quantification of potentially competitive biomineralization mechanisms that addresses nucleation and growth of the amorphous mineralmore » phases, which are important in biomineralization.« less
  • The formation of calcium carbonate mineral scale is a persistent and expensive problem in oil and gas production. The aim of this paper is to further the understanding of scale formation and inhibition by in-situ probing of crystal growth by synchrotron radiation wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) in the absence and presence of polyphosphinocarboxylic acid (PPCA) scale inhibitor. This technique offers an exciting prospect for the study of scaling.
  • Synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements were performed in situ during the formation of thin (50-600 {Angstrom}) overgrowths of otavite-calcite solid-solutions at the (1014) cleavage surface of single- crystal calcite. These solid-solutions were precipitated from EDTA-bearing aqueous solutions having varied initial saturation states of otavite and calcite. From repetitive X-ray diffraction scans, the Cd/(Ca + Cd) ratios and the effective thicknesses (average domain size perpendicular to the calcite cleavage surface) of the solid-solutions were determined as a function of time. Additional in-plane X-ray diffraction scans were done to further characterize the relationship between the solid-solutions and the calcite cleavage surface. The solid-solutionmore » phase grew epitaxially with a (1014) growth plane oriented parallel to the calcite (1014) cleavage surface. The compositions of the solid-solutions evolved with time, while their growth rates (increases in effective thickness) remained fairly constant (10-54 {Angstrom}/hr). In each experiment, the coverage of the initial surface by the solid-solution (calculated from the difference between the initial and final Cd concentrations in the aqueous solution) was about 20%. Glancing-incidence X-ray reflectivity scans were also monitored as a function of time. From these scans, we determined that the solid-water interface did not become significantly rougher during the nucleation and growth of the solid-solution phase. These observations indicate that the solid-solution grew by layer spreading and that most growth may have occurred preferentially at macrostep faces produced during cleavage. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • Real-time evolution of nanoparticles grown at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface formed between a single crystalline n-type GaAs wafer and an aqueous solution of AgNO{sub 3} has been studied by using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results reveal the distinct nucleation and growth steps involved in the growth of anisotropic Ag nanoplates on the surface of the GaAs wafer. For the first time, a quick transit stage is observed to be responsible for the structural transformation of the nuclei to form structurally stable seeds that are critical for guiding their anisotropic growth into nanoplates. Reaction between a GaAs wafer and AgNO{sub 3}more » solution at room temperature primarily produces Ag nanoplates on the surface of the GaAs wafer in the dark and at room temperature. In contrast, X-ray irradiation can induce charge separation in the GaAs wafer to drive the growth of nanoparticles made of silver oxy salt (Ag{sub 7}NO{sub 11}) and silver arsenate (Ag{sub 3}AsO{sub 4}) at the semiconductor/electrolyte interface if the GaAs wafer is illuminated by the X-ray and reaction time is long enough.« less