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Title: Morphology and Properties of Melt-Spun Polycarbonate Fibers Containing Single- and Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

Abstract

Polycarbonate fibers based single wall and multi-wall nanotubes (SWNT and MWNT) were prepared by first dispersing the nanotubes via solvent blending and/or melt extrusion followed by melt spinning the composites to facilitate nanotube alignment along the fiber axis. Morphological studies involving polarized Raman spectroscopy and wide angle X-ray scattering using a synchrotron radiation source show that reasonable levels of nanotube alignment are achievable. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations on the polymer-extracted composite fibers reveal that MWNT more readily disperse within the PC matrix and have higher aspect ratios than do SWNT; extraction of the polymer from the composite prior to TEM imaging helps overcome the common issue of poor atomic contrast between the CNT and the organic matrix. Stress-strain analysis on the composites fibers show that MWNT, in general, provide greater stiffness and strength than those based on SWNT. Despite significant reinforcement of the polycarbonate, the level of reinforcement is far below what could be achieved if the nanotubes were completely dispersed and aligned along the fiber axis as predicted by composite theory.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
914326
Report Number(s):
BNL-78894-2007-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0032-3861; POLMAG; TRN: US0802851
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Polymer
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0032-3861
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ALIGNMENT; CARBON; EXTRUSION; FIBERS; MORPHOLOGY; NANOTUBES; POLYCARBONATES; POLYMERS; RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY; SCATTERING; SOLVENTS; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Fornes, T, Baur, J, Sabba, Y, and Thomas, E. Morphology and Properties of Melt-Spun Polycarbonate Fibers Containing Single- and Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2006.01.003.
Fornes, T, Baur, J, Sabba, Y, & Thomas, E. Morphology and Properties of Melt-Spun Polycarbonate Fibers Containing Single- and Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes. United States. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2006.01.003.
Fornes, T, Baur, J, Sabba, Y, and Thomas, E. Sun . "Morphology and Properties of Melt-Spun Polycarbonate Fibers Containing Single- and Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes". United States. doi:10.1016/j.polymer.2006.01.003.
@article{osti_914326,
title = {Morphology and Properties of Melt-Spun Polycarbonate Fibers Containing Single- and Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes},
author = {Fornes, T and Baur, J and Sabba, Y and Thomas, E},
abstractNote = {Polycarbonate fibers based single wall and multi-wall nanotubes (SWNT and MWNT) were prepared by first dispersing the nanotubes via solvent blending and/or melt extrusion followed by melt spinning the composites to facilitate nanotube alignment along the fiber axis. Morphological studies involving polarized Raman spectroscopy and wide angle X-ray scattering using a synchrotron radiation source show that reasonable levels of nanotube alignment are achievable. Detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations on the polymer-extracted composite fibers reveal that MWNT more readily disperse within the PC matrix and have higher aspect ratios than do SWNT; extraction of the polymer from the composite prior to TEM imaging helps overcome the common issue of poor atomic contrast between the CNT and the organic matrix. Stress-strain analysis on the composites fibers show that MWNT, in general, provide greater stiffness and strength than those based on SWNT. Despite significant reinforcement of the polycarbonate, the level of reinforcement is far below what could be achieved if the nanotubes were completely dispersed and aligned along the fiber axis as predicted by composite theory.},
doi = {10.1016/j.polymer.2006.01.003},
journal = {Polymer},
issn = {0032-3861},
number = 5,
volume = 47,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {1}
}