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Title: Structural Basis for DNA Recognition and Processing by UvrB

Abstract

DNA-damage recognition in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) cascade is a complex process, operating on a wide variety of damages. UvrB is the central component in prokaryotic NER, directly involved in DNA-damage recognition and guiding the DNA through repair synthesis. We report the first structure of a UvrB-double-stranded DNA complex, providing insights into the mechanism by which UvrB binds DNA, leading to formation of the preincision complex. One DNA strand, containing a 3' overhang, threads behind a {beta}-hairpin motif of UvrB, indicating that this motif inserts between the strands of the double helix, thereby locking down either the damaged or undamaged strand. The nucleotide directly behind the {beta}-hairpin is flipped out and inserted into a small, highly conserved pocket in UvrB.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
914317
Report Number(s):
BNL-78885-2007-JA
TRN: US200809%%172
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol.; Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; DNA; EXCISION REPAIR; NUCLEOTIDES; PROCESSING; REPAIR; SYNTHESIS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Truglio,J., Karakas, E., Rhau, B., Wang, H., DellaVecchia, M., Van Houten, B., and Kisker, C. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition and Processing by UvrB. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1038/nsmb1072.
Truglio,J., Karakas, E., Rhau, B., Wang, H., DellaVecchia, M., Van Houten, B., & Kisker, C. Structural Basis for DNA Recognition and Processing by UvrB. United States. doi:10.1038/nsmb1072.
Truglio,J., Karakas, E., Rhau, B., Wang, H., DellaVecchia, M., Van Houten, B., and Kisker, C. Sun . "Structural Basis for DNA Recognition and Processing by UvrB". United States. doi:10.1038/nsmb1072.
@article{osti_914317,
title = {Structural Basis for DNA Recognition and Processing by UvrB},
author = {Truglio,J. and Karakas, E. and Rhau, B. and Wang, H. and DellaVecchia, M. and Van Houten, B. and Kisker, C.},
abstractNote = {DNA-damage recognition in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) cascade is a complex process, operating on a wide variety of damages. UvrB is the central component in prokaryotic NER, directly involved in DNA-damage recognition and guiding the DNA through repair synthesis. We report the first structure of a UvrB-double-stranded DNA complex, providing insights into the mechanism by which UvrB binds DNA, leading to formation of the preincision complex. One DNA strand, containing a 3' overhang, threads behind a {beta}-hairpin motif of UvrB, indicating that this motif inserts between the strands of the double helix, thereby locking down either the damaged or undamaged strand. The nucleotide directly behind the {beta}-hairpin is flipped out and inserted into a small, highly conserved pocket in UvrB.},
doi = {10.1038/nsmb1072},
journal = {Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol.},
number = 4,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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