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Title: Crystal Structures of Two Putative Phosphoheptose

Abstract

Structural genomic centers use both NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic methods to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins on a genomic scale in a high-throughput mode and to deposit in the PDB. The main goal of structural genomics is to determine a large number of protein structures to complement the ever-expanding database of genome sequences. Another role of structural genomics is to delineate the correspondence between sequence and structure space; a number of protein structures from otherwise unrelated (i.e., 8-10% sequence identity) families often prove to have remarkably similar folds. This finding, in turn, allows better understanding of the structure-function relationships in those proteins for which either structures are not available or cannot be experimentally determined.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Synchrotron Light Source
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
914152
Report Number(s):
BNL-78720-2007-JA
TRN: US0801579
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proteins: Struc. Func. Bioinformatics; Journal Volume: 63
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; CRYSTAL STRUCTURE; PROTEIN STRUCTURE; PROTEINS; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; CRYSTALLOGRAPHY; NSLS; national synchrotron light source

Citation Formats

Seetharaman,J., Rajashankar, K., Solarzano, V., Kniewel, R., Lima, C., Bonanno, J., Burley, S., and Swaminathan, S. Crystal Structures of Two Putative Phosphoheptose. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1002/prot.20908.
Seetharaman,J., Rajashankar, K., Solarzano, V., Kniewel, R., Lima, C., Bonanno, J., Burley, S., & Swaminathan, S. Crystal Structures of Two Putative Phosphoheptose. United States. doi:10.1002/prot.20908.
Seetharaman,J., Rajashankar, K., Solarzano, V., Kniewel, R., Lima, C., Bonanno, J., Burley, S., and Swaminathan, S. Sun . "Crystal Structures of Two Putative Phosphoheptose". United States. doi:10.1002/prot.20908.
@article{osti_914152,
title = {Crystal Structures of Two Putative Phosphoheptose},
author = {Seetharaman,J. and Rajashankar, K. and Solarzano, V. and Kniewel, R. and Lima, C. and Bonanno, J. and Burley, S. and Swaminathan, S.},
abstractNote = {Structural genomic centers use both NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic methods to determine three-dimensional structures of proteins on a genomic scale in a high-throughput mode and to deposit in the PDB. The main goal of structural genomics is to determine a large number of protein structures to complement the ever-expanding database of genome sequences. Another role of structural genomics is to delineate the correspondence between sequence and structure space; a number of protein structures from otherwise unrelated (i.e., 8-10% sequence identity) families often prove to have remarkably similar folds. This finding, in turn, allows better understanding of the structure-function relationships in those proteins for which either structures are not available or cannot be experimentally determined.},
doi = {10.1002/prot.20908},
journal = {Proteins: Struc. Func. Bioinformatics},
number = ,
volume = 63,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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