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Title: "Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes"

Abstract

We will present our recent studies on computational actinide chemistry of complexes which are not only interesting from the standpoint of actinide coordination chemistry but also of relevance to environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes. We will be discussing our recent collaborative efforts with Professor Heino Nitsche of LBNL whose research group has been actively carrying out experimental studies on these species. Computations of actinide complexes are also quintessential to our understanding of the complexes found in geochemical, biochemical environments and actinide chemistry relevant to advanced nuclear systems. In particular we have been studying uranyl, plutonyl, and Cm(III) complexes are in aqueous solution. These studies are made with a variety of relativistic methods such as coupled cluster methods, DFT, and complete active space multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by large-scale CI computations and relativistic CI (RCI) computations up to 60 million configurations. Our computational studies on actinide complexes were motivated by ongoing EXAFS studies of speciated complexes in geo and biochemical environments carried out by Prof Heino Nitsche's group at Berkeley, Dr. David Clark at Los Alamos and Dr. Gibson's work on small actinide molecules at ORNL. The hydrolysis reactions of urnayl, neputyl and plutonyl complexes have received considerable attention duemore » to their geochemical and biochemical importance but the results of free energies in solution and the mechanism of deprotonation have been topic of considerable uncertainty. We have computed deprotonating and migration of one water molecule from the first solvation shell to the second shell in UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}NpO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup +}, and PuO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} complexes. Our computed Gibbs free energy(7.27 kcal/m) in solution for the first time agrees with the experiment (7.1 kcal/m) while previous computations produced results in strong disagreement. We have studied the electronic and spectroscopic properties of plutonyl carbonate complexes of the types PuO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O, (n=1,2) and PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}Ca{sub 3}. Our computed equilibrium geometries and vibrational spectra of these species agree quite well with the EXAFS. Recent results on Cm(III) complexes with ligands that have multiple binding capabilities will be compared with experiment.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
913555
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-228913
TRN: US0800770
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: AAAS and the Northwest Regional ACS Conference on Chemistry of Advanced Nuclear Systems, Boise , ID, United States, Jun 16 - Jun 21, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACTINIDE COMPLEXES; ACTINIDES; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; CARBONATES; CHEMISTRY; HYDROLYSIS; PLUTONYL COMPLEXES; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SIMULATION; SOLVATION; SPECTRA; WATER

Citation Formats

Balasubramanian, K. "Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes". United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Balasubramanian, K. "Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes". United States.
Balasubramanian, K. Wed . ""Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes"". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/913555.
@article{osti_913555,
title = {"Computational Modeling of Actinide Complexes"},
author = {Balasubramanian, K},
abstractNote = {We will present our recent studies on computational actinide chemistry of complexes which are not only interesting from the standpoint of actinide coordination chemistry but also of relevance to environmental management of high-level nuclear wastes. We will be discussing our recent collaborative efforts with Professor Heino Nitsche of LBNL whose research group has been actively carrying out experimental studies on these species. Computations of actinide complexes are also quintessential to our understanding of the complexes found in geochemical, biochemical environments and actinide chemistry relevant to advanced nuclear systems. In particular we have been studying uranyl, plutonyl, and Cm(III) complexes are in aqueous solution. These studies are made with a variety of relativistic methods such as coupled cluster methods, DFT, and complete active space multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) followed by large-scale CI computations and relativistic CI (RCI) computations up to 60 million configurations. Our computational studies on actinide complexes were motivated by ongoing EXAFS studies of speciated complexes in geo and biochemical environments carried out by Prof Heino Nitsche's group at Berkeley, Dr. David Clark at Los Alamos and Dr. Gibson's work on small actinide molecules at ORNL. The hydrolysis reactions of urnayl, neputyl and plutonyl complexes have received considerable attention due to their geochemical and biochemical importance but the results of free energies in solution and the mechanism of deprotonation have been topic of considerable uncertainty. We have computed deprotonating and migration of one water molecule from the first solvation shell to the second shell in UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}, UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+}NpO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}{sup +}, and PuO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} complexes. Our computed Gibbs free energy(7.27 kcal/m) in solution for the first time agrees with the experiment (7.1 kcal/m) while previous computations produced results in strong disagreement. We have studied the electronic and spectroscopic properties of plutonyl carbonate complexes of the types PuO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O, (n=1,2) and PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}Ca{sub 3}. Our computed equilibrium geometries and vibrational spectra of these species agree quite well with the EXAFS. Recent results on Cm(III) complexes with ligands that have multiple binding capabilities will be compared with experiment.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Mar 07 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

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  • Uranium hydriding is one of the most important processes that has received considerable attention over many years. Although many experimental and modeling studies have been carried out concerning thermochemistry, diffusion kinetics and mechanisms of U-hydriding, very little is known about the electronic structure and electronic features that govern the U-hydriding process. Yet it is the electronic feature that controls the activation barrier and thus the rate of hydriding. Moreover the role of impurities and the role of the product UH{sub 3} on hydriding rating are not fully understood. An early study by Condon and Larson concerns with the kinetics ofmore » U-hydrogen system and a mathematical model for the U-hydriding process. They proposed that diffusion in the reactant phase by hydrogen before nucleation to form hydride phase and that the reaction is first order for hydriding and zero order for dehydriding. Condon has also calculated and measures the reaction rates of U-hydriding and proposed a diffusion model for the U-hydriding. This model was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental reaction rates. From the slopes of the Arrhenius plot the activation energy was calculated as 6.35 kcal/mole. In a subsequent study Kirkpatrick formulated a close-form for approximate solution to Condon's equation. Bloch and Mintz have proposed the kinetics and mechanism for the U-H reaction over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. They have discussed their results through two models, one, which considers hydrogen diffusion through a protective UH{sub 3} product layer, and the second where hydride growth occurs at the hydride-metal interface. These authors obtained two-dimensional fits of experimental data to the pressure-temperature reactions. Kirkpatrick and Condon have obtained a linear solution to hydriding of uranium. These authors showed that the calculated reaction rates compared quite well with the experimental data at a hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Powell et al. have studied U-hydriding in ultrahigh vacuum and obtained the linear rate data over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. They found reversible hydrogen sorption on the UH{sub 3} reaction product from kinetic effects at 21 C. This demonstrates restarting of the hydriding process in the presence of UH{sub 3} reaction product. DeMint and Leckey have shown that Si impurities dramatically accelerate the U-hydriding rates. We report our recent results of relativistic computations that vary from complete active space multi-configuration interaction (CAS-MCSCF) followed by multi-reference configuration interaction (MRSDCI) computations that included up to 50 million configurations for modeling of uranium-hydriding with cluster models will be presented.« less
  • Water soluble complexing agents are commonly used in separations to enhance the selectivity of both ion exchange and solvent extraction processes. Applications of this type in the treatment of nuclear wastes using conventional complexing agents have found mixed success due to the nature of the complexants. In addition, the residual solutions containing these species have led to potentially serious complications in waste storage. To overcome some of the limitations of carboxylic acid and aminopolycarboxylate ligands, we have initiated a program to investigate the complexing ability, thermal/oxidative instability, and separation potential of a group of water soluble organophosphorus compounds which wemore » call Thermally Unstable Complexants, or simply TUCS. Complexants of this type appear to be superior to conventional analogues in a number of respects. In this report, we will summarize our research to date on the actinide/lanthanide complexes with a series of substituted methanediphosphonic acids, the kinetics of their oxidative decomposition, and a few applications which have been developed for their use. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tab.« less
  • In this chapter we focus on methodological and computational aspects that are key to accurately modeling the spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular systems containing actinides within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. Our focus is on properties that require either an accurate relativistic all-electron description or an accurate description of the dynamical behavior of actinide species in an environment at finite temperature, or both. The implementation of the methods and the calculations discussed in this chapter were done with the NWChem software suite (Valiev et al. 2010). In the first two sections we discuss two methods that account formore » relativistic effects, the ZORA and the X2C Hamiltonian. Section 1.2.1 discusses the implementation of the approximate relativistic ZORA Hamiltonian and its extension to magnetic properties. Section 1.3 focuses on the exact X2C Hamiltonian and the application of this methodology to obtain accurate molecular properties. In Section 1.4 we examine the role of a dynamical environment at finite temperature as well as the presence of other ions on the thermodynamics of hydrolysis and exchange reaction mechanisms. Finally, Section 1.5 discusses the modeling of XAS (EXAFS, XANES) properties in realistic environments accounting for both the dynamics of the system and (for XANES) the relativistic effects.« less