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Title: A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS

Abstract

The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
913186
Report Number(s):
RPP-34657-FP REV 0
TRN: US0800661
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC27-99RL14047
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: MATERIALS & SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE (M&ST) 09/16/2007 THRU 09/20/2007 DETROIT MI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ALUMINATES; CARBON STEELS; CHEMISTRY; CORROSION; CRACK PROPAGATION; HANFORD RESERVATION; PLUTONIUM; POLARIZATION; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; STORAGE; STORAGE FACILITIES; STRAIN RATE; STRESS CORROSION; TANKS; TESTING; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; WASTES

Citation Formats

BOOMER, K.D.. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
BOOMER, K.D.. A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS. United States.
BOOMER, K.D.. Tue . "A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/913186.
@article{osti_913186,
title = {A STUDY OF CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS},
author = {BOOMER, K.D.},
abstractNote = {The Hanford reservation Tank Farms in Washington State has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war plutonium production. These tanks will continue to store waste until it is treated and disposed. These nuclear wastes were converted to highly alkaline pH wastes to protect the carbon steel storage tanks from corrosion. However, the carbon steel is still susceptible to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. The waste chemistry varies from tank to tank, and contains various combinations of hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, chloride, carbonate, aluminate and other species. The effect of each of these species and any synergistic effects on localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of carbon steel have been investigated with electrochemical polarization, slow strain rate, and crack growth rate testing. The effect of solution chemistry, pH, temperature and applied potential are all considered and their role in the corrosion behavior will be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Aug 21 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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