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Title: An introduction to natural gas hydrate/clathrate: The major organic carbon reserve of the Earth (editorial)

Abstract

No abstract

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. (BNL)
  2. (University of Illinois at Chicago, IL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
913016
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2007-089
Journal ID: ISSN 0920-4105; TRN: US200802%%517
DOE Contract Number:
None cited
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering; Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 1-3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; CARBON; NATURAL GAS; CLATHRATES; HYDRATES

Citation Formats

Mahajan, D., Taylor, C.E., and Mansoori, G.A. An introduction to natural gas hydrate/clathrate: The major organic carbon reserve of the Earth (editorial). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.petrol.2006.09.006.
Mahajan, D., Taylor, C.E., & Mansoori, G.A. An introduction to natural gas hydrate/clathrate: The major organic carbon reserve of the Earth (editorial). United States. doi:10.1016/j.petrol.2006.09.006.
Mahajan, D., Taylor, C.E., and Mansoori, G.A. Thu . "An introduction to natural gas hydrate/clathrate: The major organic carbon reserve of the Earth (editorial)". United States. doi:10.1016/j.petrol.2006.09.006.
@article{osti_913016,
title = {An introduction to natural gas hydrate/clathrate: The major organic carbon reserve of the Earth (editorial)},
author = {Mahajan, D. and Taylor, C.E. and Mansoori, G.A.},
abstractNote = {No abstract},
doi = {10.1016/j.petrol.2006.09.006},
journal = {Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering},
number = 1-3,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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