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Title: Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality

Abstract

Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. Five key areas of research that need further investigation have been identified. These five areas, i.e. thermal properties of hydrates in sediments, kinetics of natural hydrate dissociation, hysteresis effects, permeability of sediments to gas flow and capillary pressures within sediments, and hydrate distribution at porous scale, are important to the production models that will be used for producing methane from hydrate deposits. NETL is using both laboratory experiments and computational modeling to address these five key areas. The laboratory and computational research reinforce each other by providing feedback. The laboratory results are used in the computational models and the results from the computational modeling is used to help direct future laboratory research. The data generated at NETL will be used to help fulfill The National Methane Hydrate R&D Program of a “long-term supply of natural gas by developing the knowledge and technology base to allow commercial production of methane from domestic hydrate deposits by the year 2015” as outlined on the NETL Website [NETL Website, 2005. http://www.netl.doe.gov/scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/index.html]. Laboratory research is accomplished in one of the numerous high-pressure hydrate cells available ranging in size from 0.15 mL tomore » 15 L in volume. A dedicated high-pressure view cell within the Raman spectrometer allows for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates. Thermal conductivity of hydrates (synthetic and natural) at a certain temperature and pressure is performed in a NETL-designed cell. Computational modeling studies are investigating the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, modeling methane hydrate reservoirs, molecular dynamics simulations of hydrate formation, dissociation, and thermal properties, and Monte Carlo simulations of hydrate formation and dissociation.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
913015
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2007-088
Journal ID: ISSN 0920-4105; TRN: US200802%%516
DOE Contract Number:
None cited
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering; Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 1-3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; DISSOCIATION; FEEDBACK; GAS FLOW; GAS HYDRATES; HYDRATES; HYSTERESIS; KINETICS; METHANE; MONITORING; NATURAL GAS; PERMEABILITY; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; SEDIMENTS; SPECTROMETERS; THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES; WEBSITES; Methane; Hydrates; Computational modeling

Citation Formats

Taylor, C.E., Link, D.D., and English, N.. Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/j.petrol.2005.08.006.
Taylor, C.E., Link, D.D., & English, N.. Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality. United States. doi:10.1016/j.petrol.2005.08.006.
Taylor, C.E., Link, D.D., and English, N.. Thu . "Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality". United States. doi:10.1016/j.petrol.2005.08.006.
@article{osti_913015,
title = {Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality},
author = {Taylor, C.E. and Link, D.D. and English, N.},
abstractNote = {Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. Five key areas of research that need further investigation have been identified. These five areas, i.e. thermal properties of hydrates in sediments, kinetics of natural hydrate dissociation, hysteresis effects, permeability of sediments to gas flow and capillary pressures within sediments, and hydrate distribution at porous scale, are important to the production models that will be used for producing methane from hydrate deposits. NETL is using both laboratory experiments and computational modeling to address these five key areas. The laboratory and computational research reinforce each other by providing feedback. The laboratory results are used in the computational models and the results from the computational modeling is used to help direct future laboratory research. The data generated at NETL will be used to help fulfill The National Methane Hydrate R&D Program of a “long-term supply of natural gas by developing the knowledge and technology base to allow commercial production of methane from domestic hydrate deposits by the year 2015” as outlined on the NETL Website [NETL Website, 2005. http://www.netl.doe.gov/scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/index.html]. Laboratory research is accomplished in one of the numerous high-pressure hydrate cells available ranging in size from 0.15 mL to 15 L in volume. A dedicated high-pressure view cell within the Raman spectrometer allows for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates. Thermal conductivity of hydrates (synthetic and natural) at a certain temperature and pressure is performed in a NETL-designed cell. Computational modeling studies are investigating the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, modeling methane hydrate reservoirs, molecular dynamics simulations of hydrate formation, dissociation, and thermal properties, and Monte Carlo simulations of hydrate formation and dissociation.},
doi = {10.1016/j.petrol.2005.08.006},
journal = {Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering},
number = 1-3,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • Computer simulations are used to compare and contrast the dynamical behavior of structure I clathrate hydrates with that of ice Ic (cubic lattices). The calculations are based on recently proposed pairwise additive intermolecular potentials for the water molecules. The phonon densities of states of ice Ic and the hydrates are found to be broadly similar, not withstanding their different crystal structures. This fact explains the similarity of the observed heat capacity and infrared data. In the case of the methane hydrate the simulation predicts a distinct dynamical (localized-mode) behavior for methane molecules trapped in each type of cage. 10 figures,more » 4 tables.« less
  • Naturally occurring gas hydrate is a solid, icelike substance composed of rigid cages of water molecules that enclose molecules of gas, mainly methane. Chemically, this substance is a water clathrate of methane, often called methane clathrate, in addition to methane hydrate or gas hydrate. In an ideally saturated methane hydrate, the molar ratio of methane to water is 1:5.75, that is, equal to a volumetric ratio at standard conditions of about 164:1. Gas hydrate deposits aaoccur under specific conditions of pressure and temperature, where the supply of methane is sufficient to initiate and stabilize the hydrate structure. These conditions aremore » met on Earth in shallow sediment, less than 2,000 meters deep in two regions: (1) continental, including continental shelves at high latitudes where surface temperatures are very cold, and (2) submarine continental slopes and rises where not only is the bottom water cold but also pressures are very high. Thus in polar regions, gas hydrate is found where temperatures are cold enough for onshore and offshore permafrost to be present. During global warming, deep sea gas hydrates become more stable, but gas hydrate of polar continents and continental shelves is destabilized, leading to methane release over long time scales. Methane reaching the atmosphere from these sources contributes to the global warming trend. During a global cooling cycle, the whole system reverses. Methodologies are being developed to recover methane from this substance. Three principal methods are being considered: thermal stimulation, depressurization, and inhibitor injection.« less
  • Natural gas production from the dissociation of methane hydrate in a confined reservoir by a depressurizing downhole well was studied. The case that the well pressure was kept constant was treated, and two different linearization schemes in an axisymmetric configuration were used in the analysis. For different fixed well pressures and reservoir temperatures, approximate self similar solutions were obtained. Distributions of temperature, pressure and gas velocity field across the reservoir were evaluated. The distance of the decomposition front from the well and the natural gas production rate as functions of time were also computed. Time evolutions of the resulting profilesmore » were presented in graphical forms, and their differences with the constant well output results were studied. It was shown that the gas production rate was a sensitive function of well pressure and reservoir temperature. The sensitivity of the results to the linearization scheme used was also studied.« less