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Title: Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel

Abstract

Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels--including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability--are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
913012
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2007-085
Journal ID: ISSN 0887-0624; TRN: US200802%%513
DOE Contract Number:
None cited
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy and Fuels; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; DIESEL FUELS; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; HEATING; HIGH-PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY; METHANOL; NITROGEN; OVENS; PERFORMANCE; SILICA; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; STABILITY; STORAGE; TARGETS

Citation Formats

Link, D.D., Baltrus, J.P., and Zandhuis, P.H.. Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/ef060451q.
Link, D.D., Baltrus, J.P., & Zandhuis, P.H.. Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel. United States. doi:10.1021/ef060451q.
Link, D.D., Baltrus, J.P., and Zandhuis, P.H.. Tue . "Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel". United States. doi:10.1021/ef060451q.
@article{osti_913012,
title = {Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel},
author = {Link, D.D. and Baltrus, J.P. and Zandhuis, P.H.},
abstractNote = {Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels--including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability--are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.},
doi = {10.1021/ef060451q},
journal = {Energy and Fuels},
number = 3,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}