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Title: Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels

Abstract

Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
912936
Report Number(s):
UCRL-CONF-227353
TRN: US200802%%469
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 2007 IEEE AP-S International Symposium, Honolulu, HI, United States, Jun 10 - Jun 15, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; BACKSCATTERING; DIELECTRIC MATERIALS; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; IMPEDANCE; SCATTERING; WAVELENGTHS

Citation Formats

Casey, K, and Pao, H. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Casey, K, & Pao, H. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels. United States.
Casey, K, and Pao, H. Tue . "Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/912936.
@article{osti_912936,
title = {Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels},
author = {Casey, K and Pao, H},
abstractNote = {Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Tue Jan 16 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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