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Title: H2 Enrichment with Simultaneous CO2 Concentration in a Membrane Reactor

Abstract

NETL envisions that the gasification of carbonaceous feedstocks may be the near- to mid-term sources of hydrogen for the transition to a renewable, hydrogen-based economy. However, the environmental impacts associated with the generation and emission of greenhouses gases from the gasification process remains a substantial concern. Therefore, NETL has devoted substantial resources towards the identification of efficient hydrogen separation and carbon capture/sequestration technologies. Hydrogen membranes integrated into a water-gas shift membrane reactor have been identified as a promising means of maximizing the production of pure hydrogen while simultaneously yielding a high-pressure, concentrated CO2 containing stream ready for sequestration. Research groups, including NETL, are exploring the viability of dense metal hydrogen membrane technologies to enhance the production and separation of hydrogen as well as the capture of carbon dioxide from the coal gasification process. Areas of research to ensure the success of dense metal membrane technologies for implementation into the gasification scheme includes the fabrication of thin metallic films and support materials, an understanding of the interaction of membrane materials in the presence of both major and minor gas constituents, chemical and temperature induced morphological changes and the identification of new membrane materials through experimental and computational exploration.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
912848
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2007-064
TRN: US200802%%409
DOE Contract Number:
None cited
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Gordon Research Conference on Hydrocarbon Resources: What Can Science Do For The Better Use Of Hydrocarbon Resources?, Ventura, CA, Jan. 7-12, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; COAL GASIFICATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FABRICATION; GASES; GASIFICATION; GREENHOUSE GASES; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN; HYDROGEN-BASED ECONOMY; MEMBRANES; MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES; VIABILITY; WATER GAS; coal gasification; hydrogen; greenhouse gases; carbon sequestration; carbon capture; hydrogen membranes

Citation Formats

Taylor, C.E., Morreale, B., Howard, B.H., and Killmeyer, R.P. H2 Enrichment with Simultaneous CO2 Concentration in a Membrane Reactor. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Taylor, C.E., Morreale, B., Howard, B.H., & Killmeyer, R.P. H2 Enrichment with Simultaneous CO2 Concentration in a Membrane Reactor. United States.
Taylor, C.E., Morreale, B., Howard, B.H., and Killmeyer, R.P. Mon . "H2 Enrichment with Simultaneous CO2 Concentration in a Membrane Reactor". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_912848,
title = {H2 Enrichment with Simultaneous CO2 Concentration in a Membrane Reactor},
author = {Taylor, C.E. and Morreale, B. and Howard, B.H. and Killmeyer, R.P},
abstractNote = {NETL envisions that the gasification of carbonaceous feedstocks may be the near- to mid-term sources of hydrogen for the transition to a renewable, hydrogen-based economy. However, the environmental impacts associated with the generation and emission of greenhouses gases from the gasification process remains a substantial concern. Therefore, NETL has devoted substantial resources towards the identification of efficient hydrogen separation and carbon capture/sequestration technologies. Hydrogen membranes integrated into a water-gas shift membrane reactor have been identified as a promising means of maximizing the production of pure hydrogen while simultaneously yielding a high-pressure, concentrated CO2 containing stream ready for sequestration. Research groups, including NETL, are exploring the viability of dense metal hydrogen membrane technologies to enhance the production and separation of hydrogen as well as the capture of carbon dioxide from the coal gasification process. Areas of research to ensure the success of dense metal membrane technologies for implementation into the gasification scheme includes the fabrication of thin metallic films and support materials, an understanding of the interaction of membrane materials in the presence of both major and minor gas constituents, chemical and temperature induced morphological changes and the identification of new membrane materials through experimental and computational exploration.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • NETL envisions that the gasification of carbonaceous feedstocks may be the near- to mid-term sources of hydrogen for the transition to a renewable, hydrogen-based economy. However, the environmental impacts associated with the generation and emission of greenhouses gases from the gasification process remains a substantial concern. Therefore, NETL has devoted substantial resources towards the identification of efficient hydrogen separation and carbon capture/sequestration technologies. Hydrogen membranes integrated into a water-gas shift membrane reactor have been identified as a promising means of maximizing the production of pure hydrogen while simultaneously yielding a high-pressure, concentrated CO2 containing stream ready for sequestration.
  • The desulfation mechanisms of pre-sulfated Pt-BaO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} lean NOx trap catalysts were investigated under isothermal conditions (600 C) using H{sub 2} as the reductant. Sulfates were found to be reduced first with H{sub 2} to produce SO{sub 2}, followed by a reaction between SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} to produce H{sub 2}S. Gas analysis during the rich pulse reveals that the sulfur removal efficiency is initially proportional to the H{sub 2} concentration. At constant H{sub 2} concentration the overall desulfation efficiency decreases in the order of H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O > H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} > H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O >more » H{sub 2}, as confirmed by XPS analysis of residual sulfur in the desulfated samples. H{sub 2}O limits the evolution of SO{sub 2} at an early stage of the rich pulse and enhances the production of H{sub 2}S in later stages of reduction. CO{sub 2} is involved in both the formation of COS and the production of H{sub 2}O (via the reverse water-gas shift reaction), therefore, resulting in an increased overall efficiency.« less
  • The goal of this project is to evaluate the extensive feasibility of a novel concept called Thermal Swing Sorption Enhanced Reaction (TSSER) process to simultaneously produce H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} as a single unit operation in a sorber-reactor. The successful demonstration of the potential feasibility of the TSSER concept implies that it is worth pursuing further development of the idea. This can be done by more extensive evaluation of the basic sorptive properties of the CO{sub 2} chemisorbents at realistic high pressures and by continuing the experimental and theoretical study of the TSSER process. This will allow us tomore » substantiate the assumptions made during the preliminary design and evaluation of the process and firm up the initial conclusions. The task performed under this project consists of (i) retrofitting an existing single column sorption apparatus for measurement of high pressure CO{sub 2} sorption characteristics, (ii) measurement of high pressure CO{sub 2} chemisorption equilibria, kinetics and sorption-desorption column dynamic characteristics under the conditions of thermal swing operation of the TSSER process, (iii) experimental evaluation of the individual steps of the TSSER process (iv) development of extended mathematical model for simulating cyclic continuous operation of TSSER to aid in process scale-up and for guiding future work, (v) simulate and test SER concept using realistic syngas composition, (vi) extensive demonstration of the thermal stability of sorbents using a TGA apparatus, (vii) investigation of the surfaces of the adsorbents and adsorbed CO{sub 2} ,and (viii) test the effects of sulfur compounds found in syngas on the CO{sub 2} sorbents.« less