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Title: Transforming Power Grid Operations

Abstract

While computation is used to plan, monitor, and control power grids, some of the computational technologies now used are more than a hundred years old, and the complex interactions of power grid components impede real-time operations. Thus it is hard to speed up “state estimation,” the procedure used to estimate the status of the power grid from measured input. State estimation is the core of grid operations, including contingency analysis, automatic generation control, and optimal power flow. How fast state estimation and contingency analysis are conducted (currently about every 5 minutes) needs to be increased radically so the analysis of contingencies is comprehensive and is conducted in real time. Further, traditional state estimation is based on a power flow model and only provides a static snapshot—a tiny piece of the state of a large-scale dynamic machine. Bringing dynamic aspects into real-time grid operations poses an even bigger challenge. Working with the latest, most advanced computing techniques and hardware, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intend to transform grid operations by increasing computational speed and improving accuracy. Traditional power grid computation is conducted on single PC hardware platforms. This article shows how traditional power grid computation can be reformulated tomore » take advantage of advanced computing techniques and be converted to high-performance computing platforms (e.g., PC clusters, reconfigurable hardware, scalable multicore shared memory computers, or multithreaded architectures). The improved performance is expected to have a huge impact on how power grids are operated and managed and ultimately will lead to more reliability and better asset utilization to the power industry. New computational capabilities will be tested and demonstrated on the comprehensive grid operations platform in the Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center, which is a newly commissioned PNNL facility for research, development and demonstration of next-generation tools and technologies for enhanced energy infrastructure operations (EIOC sidebar).« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
912713
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-54302
TRN: US200801%%985
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Scientific Computing, 24(5):22-27; Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS; OPERATION; LOAD MANAGEMENT; CALCULATION METHODS; ACCURACY; FLOW MODELS; PERFORMANCE; RELIABILITY; COMPUTERIZED CONTROL SYSTEMS; high performance computing; power grid; electricity grid; energy; Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center; EIOC; SCADA

Citation Formats

Huang, Zhenyu, Guttromson, Ross T., Nieplocha, Jarek, and Pratt, Robert G. Transforming Power Grid Operations. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Huang, Zhenyu, Guttromson, Ross T., Nieplocha, Jarek, & Pratt, Robert G. Transforming Power Grid Operations. United States.
Huang, Zhenyu, Guttromson, Ross T., Nieplocha, Jarek, and Pratt, Robert G. Sun . "Transforming Power Grid Operations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_912713,
title = {Transforming Power Grid Operations},
author = {Huang, Zhenyu and Guttromson, Ross T. and Nieplocha, Jarek and Pratt, Robert G.},
abstractNote = {While computation is used to plan, monitor, and control power grids, some of the computational technologies now used are more than a hundred years old, and the complex interactions of power grid components impede real-time operations. Thus it is hard to speed up “state estimation,” the procedure used to estimate the status of the power grid from measured input. State estimation is the core of grid operations, including contingency analysis, automatic generation control, and optimal power flow. How fast state estimation and contingency analysis are conducted (currently about every 5 minutes) needs to be increased radically so the analysis of contingencies is comprehensive and is conducted in real time. Further, traditional state estimation is based on a power flow model and only provides a static snapshot—a tiny piece of the state of a large-scale dynamic machine. Bringing dynamic aspects into real-time grid operations poses an even bigger challenge. Working with the latest, most advanced computing techniques and hardware, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) intend to transform grid operations by increasing computational speed and improving accuracy. Traditional power grid computation is conducted on single PC hardware platforms. This article shows how traditional power grid computation can be reformulated to take advantage of advanced computing techniques and be converted to high-performance computing platforms (e.g., PC clusters, reconfigurable hardware, scalable multicore shared memory computers, or multithreaded architectures). The improved performance is expected to have a huge impact on how power grids are operated and managed and ultimately will lead to more reliability and better asset utilization to the power industry. New computational capabilities will be tested and demonstrated on the comprehensive grid operations platform in the Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center, which is a newly commissioned PNNL facility for research, development and demonstration of next-generation tools and technologies for enhanced energy infrastructure operations (EIOC sidebar).},
doi = {},
journal = {Scientific Computing, 24(5):22-27},
number = 5,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}