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Title: Hydrogen-induced initiation of corrosion in aluminum

Abstract

Corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys is related to the presence of a thin, passivating aluminum oxide film on the surface. In this paper, we perform first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations to provide atomic scale understanding of the initiation of corrosion in Al. Our results support the hypothesis that hydrogen plays an important role at different stages of the Al corrosion process. In particular, atomic hydrogen can penetrate into the oxide film and cause structural damage in both the oxide and at the Al/Al2O3 interface. The corrosion is then initiated by a breakdown of the oxide film and a subsequent pit development on the surface of the metal exposed to the environment.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
912483
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-07-12140
TRN: US200801%%1044
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry C; Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 19
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 - MATERIALS SCIENCE, 54 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ALLOYS; ALUMINIUM; BREAKDOWN; CORROSION; CORROSION RESISTANCE; HYDROGEN; HYPOTHESIS; OXIDES; adsorption; alumina; corrosion; eta; gamma-alumina; hydrogen blisters; metals; molecular-dynamics; pitting; surfaces; transition aluminas

Citation Formats

Sergey N. Rashkeev, K. W. Sohlberg, S. P. Zhuo, and S. T. Pantelides. Hydrogen-induced initiation of corrosion in aluminum. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1021/jp0707687.
Sergey N. Rashkeev, K. W. Sohlberg, S. P. Zhuo, & S. T. Pantelides. Hydrogen-induced initiation of corrosion in aluminum. United States. doi:10.1021/jp0707687.
Sergey N. Rashkeev, K. W. Sohlberg, S. P. Zhuo, and S. T. Pantelides. Tue . "Hydrogen-induced initiation of corrosion in aluminum". United States. doi:10.1021/jp0707687.
@article{osti_912483,
title = {Hydrogen-induced initiation of corrosion in aluminum},
author = {Sergey N. Rashkeev and K. W. Sohlberg and S. P. Zhuo and S. T. Pantelides},
abstractNote = {Corrosion resistance of aluminum alloys is related to the presence of a thin, passivating aluminum oxide film on the surface. In this paper, we perform first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations to provide atomic scale understanding of the initiation of corrosion in Al. Our results support the hypothesis that hydrogen plays an important role at different stages of the Al corrosion process. In particular, atomic hydrogen can penetrate into the oxide film and cause structural damage in both the oxide and at the Al/Al2O3 interface. The corrosion is then initiated by a breakdown of the oxide film and a subsequent pit development on the surface of the metal exposed to the environment.},
doi = {10.1021/jp0707687},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry C},
number = 19,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • The presence of corrosive environments, particularly chloride-containing solutions, usually lowers the fatigue resistance of metals by speeding the process of crack initiation. Such cracking phenomena generally initiate at corrosion pits which, for many aluminum alloys, serve as stress concentrators once they reach a critical size of some 40 to 50 {mu}. A growing body of empirical information is being reported on the effect of convective mass transport on early stages of pitting corrosion. This paper reports on the effect of fluid flow on corrosion fatigue crack initiation.
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  • Stainless steel (SS) samples were irradiated with protons at 400 C and strained in 288 C water to examine the role of oxide particles in the irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) process. Oxides in the matrix acted as the predominant crack initiation sites, and the amount of cracking scaled with oxide density. Intergranular cracking occurred by mechanical failure of oxide particles that created electrochemical crevices and stress concentrators from which intergranular cracks could propagate. Relatively few of the cracked oxide particles actually led to intergranular cracking in the matrix, which was consistent with the requirement that the crack tip solutionmore » had to be deaerated for an aggressive crevice chemistry to form and that the cracks in the oxides had to be well aligned with susceptible grain boundaries. Intergranular cracking occurred only when both the SS was irradiated and when straining was conducted in high-temperature water. This observation supported on IASCC mechanism that required an aggressive environment and an irradiated microstructure.« less