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Title: Modeling for Insights

Abstract

System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
912467
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-07-12566
TRN: US0800412
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Idaho Academy of Science 49th Meeting and Symposium,Idaho Falls,04/19/2007,04/21/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 - GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; DESIGN; MANAGEMENT; NUCLEAR FUELS; NUCLEAR POWER; PERFORMANCE; SIMULATION; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; Modeling; System Dynamics

Citation Formats

Jacob J. Jacobson, and Gretchen Matthern. Modeling for Insights. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Jacob J. Jacobson, & Gretchen Matthern. Modeling for Insights. United States.
Jacob J. Jacobson, and Gretchen Matthern. 2007. "Modeling for Insights". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/912467.
@article{osti_912467,
title = {Modeling for Insights},
author = {Jacob J. Jacobson and Gretchen Matthern},
abstractNote = {System Dynamics is a computer-aided approach to evaluating the interrelationships of different components and activities within complex systems. Recently, System Dynamics models have been developed in areas such as policy design, biological and medical modeling, energy and the environmental analysis, and in various other areas in the natural and social sciences. The real power of System Dynamic modeling is gaining insights into total system behavior as time, and system parameters are adjusted and the effects are visualized in real time. System Dynamic models allow decision makers and stakeholders to explore long-term behavior and performance of complex systems, especially in the context of dynamic processes and changing scenarios without having to wait decades to obtain field data or risk failure if a poor management or design approach is used. The Idaho National Laboratory recently has been developing a System Dynamic model of the US Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The model is intended to be used to identify and understand interactions throughout the entire nuclear fuel cycle and suggest sustainable development strategies. This paper describes the basic framework of the current model and presents examples of useful insights gained from the model thus far with respect to sustainable development of nuclear power.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2007,
month = 4
}

Conference:
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