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Title: Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory

Abstract

Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
912465
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-07-12519
TRN: US200801%%895
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Idaho Academy of Science,University Place, Idaho Falls,04/19/2007,04/21/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ARCHITECTURE; CLASSIFICATION; DESERTS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; SNAKE RIVER PLAIN; archaeology; hunting and gathering; prehistoric rock structures

Citation Formats

Brenda R Pace. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Brenda R Pace. Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory. United States.
Brenda R Pace. Sun . "Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/912465.
@article{osti_912465,
title = {Prehistoric Rock Structures of the Idaho National Laboratory},
author = {Brenda R Pace},
abstractNote = {Over the past 13,500 years, human populations have lived in and productively utilized the natural resources offered by the cold desert environment of the northeastern Snake River Plain in eastern Idaho. Within an overall framework of hunting and gathering, groups relied on an intimate familiarity with the natural world and developed a variety of technologies to extract the resources that they needed to survive. Useful items were abundant and found everywhere on the landscape. Even the basaltic terrain and the rocks, themselves, were put to productive use. This paper presents a preliminary classification scheme for rock structures built on the Idaho National Laboratory landscape by prehistoric aboriginal populations, including discussions of the overall architecture of the structures, associated artifact assemblages, and topographic placement. Adopting an ecological perspective, the paper concludes with a discussion of the possible functions of these unique resources for the desert populations that once called the INL home.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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