skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Integrated Waste Management Strategy and Radioactive Waste Forms for the 21st Century

Abstract

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) was announced in 2006. As currently envisioned, GNEP will be the basis for growth of nuclear energy worldwide, using a closed proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The Integrated Waste Management Strategy (IWMS) is designed to ensure that all wastes generated by fuel fabrication and recycling will have a routine disposition path making the most of feedback to fuel and recycling operations to eliminate or minimize byproducts and wastes. If waste must be generated, processes will be designed with waste treatment in mind to reduce use of reagents that complicate stabilization and minimize volume. The IWMS will address three distinct levels of technology investigation and systems analyses and will provide a cogent path from (1) research and development (R&D) and engineering scale demonstration, (Level I); to (2) full scale domestic deployment (Level II); and finally to (3) establishing an integrated global nuclear energy infrastructure (Level III). The near-term focus of GNEP is on achieving a basis for large-scale commercial deployment (Level II), including the R&D and engineering scale activities in Level I that are necessary to support such an accomplishment. Throughout these levels is the need for innovative thinking to simplify,more » including regulations, separations and waste forms to minimize the burden of safe disposition of wastes on the fuel cycle.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
912455
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-06-11905
TRN: US0800405
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Alternative Materials for Radioactive Waste Stabilization and Nuclear Materials Containment,Barga, Italy,03/25/2007,03/29/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 - MGMT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES, 11 - NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; CONTAINMENT; FABRICATION; FEEDBACK; FUEL CYCLE; NUCLEAR ENERGY; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; RECYCLING; REGULATIONS; STABILIZATION; WASTE FORMS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES; fuel reprocessing; GNEP; nuclear waste; waste forms; waste management

Citation Formats

Dirk Gombert, and Jay Roach. Integrated Waste Management Strategy and Radioactive Waste Forms for the 21st Century. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Dirk Gombert, & Jay Roach. Integrated Waste Management Strategy and Radioactive Waste Forms for the 21st Century. United States.
Dirk Gombert, and Jay Roach. Thu . "Integrated Waste Management Strategy and Radioactive Waste Forms for the 21st Century". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/912455.
@article{osti_912455,
title = {Integrated Waste Management Strategy and Radioactive Waste Forms for the 21st Century},
author = {Dirk Gombert and Jay Roach},
abstractNote = {The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) was announced in 2006. As currently envisioned, GNEP will be the basis for growth of nuclear energy worldwide, using a closed proliferation-resistant fuel cycle. The Integrated Waste Management Strategy (IWMS) is designed to ensure that all wastes generated by fuel fabrication and recycling will have a routine disposition path making the most of feedback to fuel and recycling operations to eliminate or minimize byproducts and wastes. If waste must be generated, processes will be designed with waste treatment in mind to reduce use of reagents that complicate stabilization and minimize volume. The IWMS will address three distinct levels of technology investigation and systems analyses and will provide a cogent path from (1) research and development (R&D) and engineering scale demonstration, (Level I); to (2) full scale domestic deployment (Level II); and finally to (3) establishing an integrated global nuclear energy infrastructure (Level III). The near-term focus of GNEP is on achieving a basis for large-scale commercial deployment (Level II), including the R&D and engineering scale activities in Level I that are necessary to support such an accomplishment. Throughout these levels is the need for innovative thinking to simplify, including regulations, separations and waste forms to minimize the burden of safe disposition of wastes on the fuel cycle.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • No abstract prepared.
  • The sustainability of an energy policy depends on the manner in which it satisfies environmental, economical and social requirements. Nuclear energy is not an exception. The objectives of the future nuclear systems, as defined in the Generation IV International Forum, tend to optimize the ability of nuclear energy to satisfy sustainable development goals. In this regard, they involve strong commitments concerning waste management policy : five designs in six are based on a closed fuel cycle, in order to minimize the volume and radiotoxicity of final waste, and to recycle the fissile materials to save natural resources. Since its beginnings,more » the French civil nuclear programme has considered a long-term perspective and has developed spent fuel reprocessing. The French current industrial technology has already permitted to recycle 96% of spent fuel materials, to save 30% of natural resources, to reduce by 5 the amount of waste and to reduce by 10 the waste radiotoxicity, all these benefits for less than 6% of the kWh total cost. This strategy has always been criticized by the nuclear opponents, precisely because they saw that it was a sustainable way, and didn't accept to consider nuclear energy as a sustainable source of power. Two arguments were put forward these criticisms. First, the cost of reprocessing versus once-through cycle and second, the risk of proliferation induced by U-Pu partitioning process. These arguments were also invoked in international debates, and they have also been pleaded by the anti-nukes during the National Debate on HLLLW, at the end of 2005, preceding the vote of a new law in 2006 by the French parliament. Fortunately they have not convinced public opinion in France nor political decision-makers. A majority of people with no regard to technical background understand that recycling and saving the natural resources are sustainable principles. And, from a technical point of view, the 6% over cost does not seem significant considering the economics of nuclear power. Lastly, the risk proliferation is more related to the front-end technologies than to the back-end ones. So, the 2006 French Law 'for a sustainable radioactive waste management' has reinforced the closed-cycle strategy and has paved the way for a long-term development of nuclear energy in the 21. century and beyond, towards the third and fourth generations of nuclear systems. It has defined an R and D programme including the continuation of partitioning-transmutation of minor actinides and their recycling in 4. generation fast reactors. In parallel, the French president has committed the French Atomic Energy Commission to implement a 4. generation prototype reactor by 2020, with international cooperation, to guarantee the permanence of technology progress. In this regard, the waste management strategy can't be built without taking into account the perspectives of development of nuclear energy. These perspectives must include the best available technologies and, in the other hand, an adaptation to the political evolutions of societies. (authors)« less
  • The intent of this paper is to discuss the impact of a fully integrated recycling program on the waste management plan of a large operations plant site of a major US company. The paper will review the establishment of the recycling effort, the interview and acquisition of vendors, the ongoing education and development of participation for employees, the selection of commodities to be recycled, measurements of success, and the continuous evaluation used to improve the recycling program, since its initiation in 1989, to a point where the site`s recycling effort yields dividends both in the sale of the commodities andmore » cost avoidance over conventional disposal practices. This facility is located approximately 20 miles north of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and supports a site population of over six thousand employees working predominantly in both manufacturing and research divisions. The recycling effort of this site has consistently, during 1996, averaged over 150 tons of recyclable materials monthly. The site involves all its employees in the process through individual separation of paper materials, but retains its own waste management department for the collection, preparation and shipment of most elements of the recycling effort. This site, and the company it represents, enjoy an excellent relationship within their host community stemming, in part, to its commitment to environmental stewardship represented by this successful program. The paper, and technical presentation, will review the evolution of the recycling effort from initial and complete compliance to state and municipal requirements to a program which is now a significant, and fully integrated, part of this facility`s ability to process its waste materials in a safe, ethical, and cost effective fashion.« less
  • The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditionalmore » and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.« less
  • This paper addresses the plans and strategies for remediation of the Liquid Low-Level Waste (LLLW) system tanks that have been removed from service at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO), the EPA-Region IV, and the Tennessee Departmentmore » of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One requirement of the FFA is that LLLW tanks that are removed from service must be evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. The Environmental Restoration Program intends to meet this requirement by using a {open_quotes}streamlined{close_quote} approach for selected tanks. This approach will combine the CERCLA Site Investigation. Remedial Action, Feasibility Study, and Proposed Plan requirements into a single Interim Proposed Plan document. This streamlined approach is expected to reduce the time required to complete the regulatory process while attaining acceptable risk reduction in a cost-effective way.« less