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Title: Materials for Hydrogen Generation via Water Electrolysis

Abstract

A review is presented of materials that could be utilized as electrolytes (and their associated electrodes and interconnect materials) in solid-state electrolysis cells to convert water (or steam) into hydrogen and oxygen. Electrolytes that function as oxygen ion conductors or proton conductors are considered for various operating temperatures from approximately 80 °C to 1000 °C. The fundamental electrochemical reactions are reviewed with some discussion of special sources of steam and DC electricity (advanced nuclear) to drive the reactions at the higher temperatures.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
912380
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-05-00366
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2461; JMTSAS; TRN: US200801%%813
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Materials Science; Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 - HYDROGEN; ELECTRICITY; ELECTRODES; ELECTROLYSIS; ELECTROLYTES; HYDROGEN; OXYGEN; OXYGEN IONS; PROTONS; STEAM; WATER; electrolytes; solid-state electrolysis cells

Citation Formats

Paul A. Lessing. Materials for Hydrogen Generation via Water Electrolysis. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s10853-006-0398-8.
Paul A. Lessing. Materials for Hydrogen Generation via Water Electrolysis. United States. doi:10.1007/s10853-006-0398-8.
Paul A. Lessing. Tue . "Materials for Hydrogen Generation via Water Electrolysis". United States. doi:10.1007/s10853-006-0398-8.
@article{osti_912380,
title = {Materials for Hydrogen Generation via Water Electrolysis},
author = {Paul A. Lessing},
abstractNote = {A review is presented of materials that could be utilized as electrolytes (and their associated electrodes and interconnect materials) in solid-state electrolysis cells to convert water (or steam) into hydrogen and oxygen. Electrolytes that function as oxygen ion conductors or proton conductors are considered for various operating temperatures from approximately 80 °C to 1000 °C. The fundamental electrochemical reactions are reviewed with some discussion of special sources of steam and DC electricity (advanced nuclear) to drive the reactions at the higher temperatures.},
doi = {10.1007/s10853-006-0398-8},
journal = {Journal of Materials Science},
number = 10,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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