skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Idaho Explosives Detection System

Abstract

The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
912318
Report Number(s):
INEEL/JOU-04-02577
TRN: US200801%%756
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and; Journal Volume: 241; Journal Issue: 1 - 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 - GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTERS; DETECTION; EXPLOSIVES; NAI DETECTORS; NEUTRON GENERATORS; PERFORMANCE; TESTING; explosive detection; neutron generator

Citation Formats

Edward L. Reber, Larry G. Blackwood, Andrew J. Edwards, J. Keith Jewell, Kenneth W. Rohde, Edward H. Seabury, and Jeffery B. Klinger. Idaho Explosives Detection System. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2005.07.235.
Edward L. Reber, Larry G. Blackwood, Andrew J. Edwards, J. Keith Jewell, Kenneth W. Rohde, Edward H. Seabury, & Jeffery B. Klinger. Idaho Explosives Detection System. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2005.07.235.
Edward L. Reber, Larry G. Blackwood, Andrew J. Edwards, J. Keith Jewell, Kenneth W. Rohde, Edward H. Seabury, and Jeffery B. Klinger. Thu . "Idaho Explosives Detection System". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2005.07.235.
@article{osti_912318,
title = {Idaho Explosives Detection System},
author = {Edward L. Reber and Larry G. Blackwood and Andrew J. Edwards and J. Keith Jewell and Kenneth W. Rohde and Edward H. Seabury and Jeffery B. Klinger},
abstractNote = {The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.},
doi = {10.1016/j.nimb.2005.07.235},
journal = {Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and},
number = 1 - 4,
volume = 241,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Thu Dec 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}
  • The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying bulk explosives into military bases. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of sodium iodide (NaI) detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A computer connects to the system by Ethernet and is able to control the system remotely. The system was developed to detect bulk explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. In 2004,more » a full-scale prototype IEDS system was built for testing and continued development. System performance was successfully tested using different types of real explosives with a variety of cargo at the INL from November 2005 through February 2006. Recently, the first deployable prototype system was constructed and shipped to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio and will be in operation by March 2007. The capability of passively detecting radiological material within a delivery truck has also been added.« less
  • The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a mediummore » size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.« less
  • It has been shown that for all known explosives, there is a very strong correlation between their O and N concentrations. C is the third element that is also common to all explosives. A system therefore, that could identify and quantify all three elements, would provide more reliable information about the interrogated material. A pulsed fast-thermal neutron system (10{sup 3}-10{sup 4} n/10 {mu}s pulse) is used for the simultaneous identification of C, N, and O. Gamma rays from the (n,n{prime}{gamma}) and (n,{gamma}) reactions help identify these elements. Data from various explosive simulants indicate the feasibility of the method. The responsemore » of various types of {gamma}-ray detectors in the presence of a large neutron flux will be discussed.« less
  • From joint meeting of the American Nuclear Society and the Atomic Industrial Forum and Nuclear Energy Exhibition; San Francisco, California, USA (11 Nov 1973). See CONF-731101-.