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Title: Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho

Abstract

Tribal people in southeast Idaho sincerely desire that archaeologists include Shoshone concepts of spirituality when investigating archaeological materials and sites. However, most archaeologists and resource managers have little understanding about these concepts and this creates difficulties. We examine two important aspects of the Shoshone soul, Mugua’ and Nabushi’aipe, and discuss how understanding these attributes aid in explaining why certain archaeological remains are considered sacred. A greater understanding of Shoshone spirituality will begin to bridge the needs of both tribal people and archaeologists.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
912119
Report Number(s):
INEEL/JOU-00-01354
TRN: US200801%%313
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: The Society For American Archaeology; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 - GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; IDAHO; AMERICAN INDIANS; ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES; ARCHAEOLOGICAL SPECIMENS; archaeological; Idaho; Shoshone; spirituality; tribal

Citation Formats

Dean, P. A., and Marler, Clayton Fay. Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
Dean, P. A., & Marler, Clayton Fay. Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho. United States.
Dean, P. A., and Marler, Clayton Fay. 2001. "Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_912119,
title = {Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho},
author = {Dean, P. A. and Marler, Clayton Fay},
abstractNote = {Tribal people in southeast Idaho sincerely desire that archaeologists include Shoshone concepts of spirituality when investigating archaeological materials and sites. However, most archaeologists and resource managers have little understanding about these concepts and this creates difficulties. We examine two important aspects of the Shoshone soul, Mugua’ and Nabushi’aipe, and discuss how understanding these attributes aid in explaining why certain archaeological remains are considered sacred. A greater understanding of Shoshone spirituality will begin to bridge the needs of both tribal people and archaeologists.},
doi = {},
journal = {The Society For American Archaeology},
number = 2,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = 2001,
month = 3
}
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