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Title: Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory

Abstract

During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NNSA
OSTI Identifier:
911963
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-07-12289
TRN: US0800244
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 - MGMT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES, 42 - ENGINEERING; CLOSURES; CONTAINERS; PLATES; RESISTANCE WELDING; SHIELDING; SHIELDS; STAINLESS STEELS; TESTING; THICKNESS; ULTRASONIC WAVES; WELDING; nuclear fuel canister; Staubli quick disconnect fitting; tube pinch seal welding

Citation Formats

Larry Zirker, Lance Lauerhass, and James Dowalo. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/911963.
Larry Zirker, Lance Lauerhass, & James Dowalo. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory. United States. doi:10.2172/911963.
Larry Zirker, Lance Lauerhass, and James Dowalo. Thu . "Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory". United States. doi:10.2172/911963. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911963.
@article{osti_911963,
title = {Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory},
author = {Larry Zirker and Lance Lauerhass and James Dowalo},
abstractNote = {During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.},
doi = {10.2172/911963},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The data are presented which were obtained in Loss-of-Coolant Experiments (LOCE) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which demonstrate the presence of cladding rewetting after the critical heat flux has been exceeded as a viable cooling mechanism during the blowdown phase of a LOCE. A brief review of the mechanisms associated with the boiling crisis and rewetting is also provided. The relevance of INEL LOCE rewetting data to nuclear reactor licensing Evaluation Model Requirements is considered, and the conclusion is made that the elimination of rewetting and return to nucleate boiling (RNB) in Evaluation Models represents a definite conservatism.
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