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Title: Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey

Abstract

A literature survey was conducted to collect information and summarize the methods available to capture iodine from fuel reprocessing off-gases. Techniques were categorized as either wet scrubbing or solid adsorbent methods, and each method was generally described as it might be used under reprocessing conditions. Decontamination factors are quoted only to give a rough indication of the effectiveness of the method. No attempt is made to identify a preferred capture method at this time, although activities are proposed that would provide a consistent baseline that would aid in evaluating technologies.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
911962
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-07-12299
TRN: US0800243
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 - RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; ADSORBENTS; DECONTAMINATION; EFFICIENCY; IODINE; REPROCESSING; SCRUBBING; fuel reprocessing; iodine capture; off-gas; solid adsorbent; wet scrubbing

Citation Formats

Daryl Haefner. Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/911962.
Daryl Haefner. Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey. United States. doi:10.2172/911962.
Daryl Haefner. Thu . "Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey". United States. doi:10.2172/911962. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911962.
@article{osti_911962,
title = {Methods of Gas Phase Capture of Iodine from Fuel Reprocessing Off-Gas: A Literature Survey},
author = {Daryl Haefner},
abstractNote = {A literature survey was conducted to collect information and summarize the methods available to capture iodine from fuel reprocessing off-gases. Techniques were categorized as either wet scrubbing or solid adsorbent methods, and each method was generally described as it might be used under reprocessing conditions. Decontamination factors are quoted only to give a rough indication of the effectiveness of the method. No attempt is made to identify a preferred capture method at this time, although activities are proposed that would provide a consistent baseline that would aid in evaluating technologies.},
doi = {10.2172/911962},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Emphasis was focused on the operating parameters that most strongly affected the optimization of the processes used to treat actual process or feed streams which simulated actual compositions occurring at nuclear facilities. These parameters included gas superficial velocity, temperature, types of organic and inorganic contaminants, relative humidity, iodine feed-gas concentration, iodine species, column design (for both acid-scrub and solid sorbent-based processes), sorbent particle size, run time, intense radiation (solid sorbents only), and scrub-acid concentration. The most promising acid-scrub process for removal of iodine species from off-gases appears to be Iodox. The most promising solid sorbent for removal of iodine speciesmore » from off-gases is the West German Ag-KTB--AgNO/sub 3/-impregnated amorphous silicic acid. The tandem silver mordenite--lead mordenite sorbent system is also quite attractive. Only a limited number of processes have thus far been studied for removal of iodine species from low-level liquid waste streams. The most extensive successful operating experience has been obtained with anion exchange resins utilized at nuclear power reactors. Bench-scale engineering tests have indicated that the best process for removal of all types of iodine species from liquid waste streams may be treatment on a packed bed containing a mixture of sorbents with affinity for both elemental and anionic species of iodine. 154 references, 7 figures, 21 tables.« less
  • Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. Thismore » report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.« less
  • The state-of-the-art for the continuous monitoring of /sup 14/C, /sup 129/I, and /sup 85/K was evaluated. Published methodology and developmental programs at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant are summarized. A sequential monitor is proposed where all forms of /sup 14/C and /sup 129/I are catalytically converted to a single form (CO/sub 2/ or I/sub 2/) and separated from interferences by selective permeation. Lastly, /sup 85/K is monitored with a beta detector mounted in a flow chamber. A developmental program for extending the state-of-the-art is outlined. 6 figures, 6 tables.