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Title: Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections

Abstract

The need to address increasingly challenging inspection requirements (such as large volume objects, very fast inspection throughputs, potentially significant shielding, etc.) for such items as nuclear materials and explosives will require the use of active interrogation technologies. While these active technologies can successfully address these challenges by inducing unique, temporal signatures, the inspection environment will also induce overall “background signals” that can be orders of magnitude larger than the induced signatures. Detectors that can successfully operate in these types of customized, inspection environments (pulsed and continuous) and successfully extract induced signature data are clearly needed and will effectively define the limitations of any active inspection system. A novel silicon carbide detector is now being investigated to successfully address both neutron- and photon/bremsstrahlung-type inspection applications. While this paper describes this detector and highlights efforts related to neutron inspection, it will focus on its neutron and gamma-ray/photon detection performance in neutron- and bremssstrahlung-type inspection applications.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
911937
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-07-12143
TRN: US0800227
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: GOMACTech-07,Buena Vista, FL,03/18/2007,03/22/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 - NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; DETECTION; EXPLOSIVES; NEUTRONS; PERFORMANCE; SHIELDING; SILICON CARBIDES; active interrogation; fast timing.; neutron and gamma detection; prompt radiation emissions

Citation Formats

F. H. Ruddy, J.G. Seidel, and R.W. Flammang. Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
F. H. Ruddy, J.G. Seidel, & R.W. Flammang. Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections. United States.
F. H. Ruddy, J.G. Seidel, and R.W. Flammang. Thu . "Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911937.
@article{osti_911937,
title = {Novel Silicon Carbide Detector for Active Inspections},
author = {F. H. Ruddy and J.G. Seidel and R.W. Flammang},
abstractNote = {The need to address increasingly challenging inspection requirements (such as large volume objects, very fast inspection throughputs, potentially significant shielding, etc.) for such items as nuclear materials and explosives will require the use of active interrogation technologies. While these active technologies can successfully address these challenges by inducing unique, temporal signatures, the inspection environment will also induce overall “background signals” that can be orders of magnitude larger than the induced signatures. Detectors that can successfully operate in these types of customized, inspection environments (pulsed and continuous) and successfully extract induced signature data are clearly needed and will effectively define the limitations of any active inspection system. A novel silicon carbide detector is now being investigated to successfully address both neutron- and photon/bremsstrahlung-type inspection applications. While this paper describes this detector and highlights efforts related to neutron inspection, it will focus on its neutron and gamma-ray/photon detection performance in neutron- and bremssstrahlung-type inspection applications.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Current requirements of some Homeland Security active interrogation projects for the detection of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) necessitate the development of faster inspection and acquisition capabilities. In order to do so, fast detectors which can operate during and shortly after intense interrogation radiation flashes are being developed. Novel silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor Schottky diodes have been utilized as robust neutron and photon detectors in both pulsed photon and pulsed neutron fields and are being integrated into active inspection environments to allow exploitation of both prompt and delayed emissions. These detectors have demonstrated the capability of detecting both photon and neutronmore » events during intense photon flashes typical of an active inspection environment. Beyond the inherent insensitivity of SiC to gamma radiation, fast digitization and processing has demonstrated that pulse shape discrimination (PSD) in combination with amplitude discrimination can further suppress unwanted gamma signals and extract fast neutron signatures. Usable neutron signals have been extracted from mixed radiation fields where the background has exceeded the signals of interest by >1000:1.« less
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  • Full-size models of a detector unit for a silicon microvertex detector were built for the KEK B factory. The Flip-Chip Bonding (FCB) method using a new type anisotropic conductive film (ACF) was examined. The structure using the new type ACF and improved fabrication process provide a sufficient electrical connection and good reliability for the detector unit.
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