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Title: Detection of Microbial sulfate-reduction associated with buried stainless steel coupons

Abstract

The objective of this study was to demonstrate applicability of an innovative radioactive isotope method for imaging microbial activity in geological materials to a comprehensive study of metal corrosion. The method was tested on a sample of stainless steel coupons that had been buried as part of a corrosion study initiated by the National Institute of Standards and Testing or NIST (known as National Bureau of Standards prior to 1988) in 1970. The images showed evidence of microbial activity that could be mapped on a millimeter scale to coupon surfaces. A second more conventional isotope tracer method was also used to provide a quantitative measure of the same type of microbial activity in soil proximal to the buried coupons. Together the techniques offer a method for evaluating low metabolic levels of activity that have the potential for significant cumulative corrosion effects. The methods are powerful tools for evaluation of potential for microbial induced corrosion to buried steel components used on pipelines, in the power and communications infrastructure, and in nuclear waste repository containers.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - EM
OSTI Identifier:
911935
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-06-11127
TRN: US0800225
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Corrosion NACExpo 2007,Nashville, TN,03/11/2007,03/15/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COMMUNICATIONS; CONTAINERS; CORROSION; DETECTION; EVALUATION; PIPELINES; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SOILS; STAINLESS STEELS; STEELS; TESTING; US NBS; microbial sulfate reduction; Microbially enhanced corrosion; radioactive isotope tracer; stainless steel

Citation Formats

Mark E. Delwiche, M. Kay Adler Flitton, and Alicia Olson. Detection of Microbial sulfate-reduction associated with buried stainless steel coupons. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Mark E. Delwiche, M. Kay Adler Flitton, & Alicia Olson. Detection of Microbial sulfate-reduction associated with buried stainless steel coupons. United States.
Mark E. Delwiche, M. Kay Adler Flitton, and Alicia Olson. Thu . "Detection of Microbial sulfate-reduction associated with buried stainless steel coupons". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911935.
@article{osti_911935,
title = {Detection of Microbial sulfate-reduction associated with buried stainless steel coupons},
author = {Mark E. Delwiche and M. Kay Adler Flitton and Alicia Olson},
abstractNote = {The objective of this study was to demonstrate applicability of an innovative radioactive isotope method for imaging microbial activity in geological materials to a comprehensive study of metal corrosion. The method was tested on a sample of stainless steel coupons that had been buried as part of a corrosion study initiated by the National Institute of Standards and Testing or NIST (known as National Bureau of Standards prior to 1988) in 1970. The images showed evidence of microbial activity that could be mapped on a millimeter scale to coupon surfaces. A second more conventional isotope tracer method was also used to provide a quantitative measure of the same type of microbial activity in soil proximal to the buried coupons. Together the techniques offer a method for evaluating low metabolic levels of activity that have the potential for significant cumulative corrosion effects. The methods are powerful tools for evaluation of potential for microbial induced corrosion to buried steel components used on pipelines, in the power and communications infrastructure, and in nuclear waste repository containers.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Ultra thin films (12nm) were sputter deposited onto cylindrical germanium internal reflection elements pre-coated with a thin (2 nm) layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Two crystals were inserted into Circle cell flow-through chambers and mounted on the optical bench of an Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. One chamber was maintained as a sterile control while the other was sequentially inoculated with four bacterial species: Psudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtillis, Hafnia alvei, and Desulfovibrio gigas, in that order. The water absorption band (1640cm{sup -4}) was monitored and used to follow that deterioration of the ultra thin films. In this respect, the sterilemore » control and inoculated films exhibited only slight differences during the 1000h course of the experiment. Assay of the visible biofilm that has accumulated on the surface of the inoculated crystal after 1000h revealed that the film incorporated viable cells from all four strains.« less
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