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Title: The Meaning of the Sampling of the ZPPR Canisters And Proposed New Surveillance Operating Instructions

Abstract

Analysis of the sample data taken from the ZPPR canisters containing Uranium plate fuel indicates that (as of February 2004) hydriding could be occurring in 35 of them. Since there appears to be no way of determining that a getter is functional, the getters in all the canisters should be replaced now (unless canister residence time can be determined) to prevent further hydriding. In addition, the surveillance procedure should be modified. Canisters to be inspected should be selected sequentially, 12 each quarter resulting in all being opened once every five years. Three of the 12 should be sampled and results reported before opening any of the canisters. Water vapor and pressure should be measured as well as the current hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Then all 12 canisters should be opened for physical evaluation of the plate conditions and correlation with the sample measurements. The getters should be replaced at each inspection ensuring that no getter is used more than five years. The data should be analyzed each year and a conclusion made on the adequacy of the surveillance procedure and modifications made if it is inadequate.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
911933
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-05-00696
TRN: US0800223
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 - MGMT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; CONTAINERS; EVALUATION; GETTERS; HYDROGEN; MODIFICATIONS; NITROGEN; OPENINGS; OXYGEN; PLATES; SAMPLING; URANIUM; WATER VAPOR

Citation Formats

Charles W. Solbrig. The Meaning of the Sampling of the ZPPR Canisters And Proposed New Surveillance Operating Instructions. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/911933.
Charles W. Solbrig. The Meaning of the Sampling of the ZPPR Canisters And Proposed New Surveillance Operating Instructions. United States. doi:10.2172/911933.
Charles W. Solbrig. Mon . "The Meaning of the Sampling of the ZPPR Canisters And Proposed New Surveillance Operating Instructions". United States. doi:10.2172/911933. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911933.
@article{osti_911933,
title = {The Meaning of the Sampling of the ZPPR Canisters And Proposed New Surveillance Operating Instructions},
author = {Charles W. Solbrig},
abstractNote = {Analysis of the sample data taken from the ZPPR canisters containing Uranium plate fuel indicates that (as of February 2004) hydriding could be occurring in 35 of them. Since there appears to be no way of determining that a getter is functional, the getters in all the canisters should be replaced now (unless canister residence time can be determined) to prevent further hydriding. In addition, the surveillance procedure should be modified. Canisters to be inspected should be selected sequentially, 12 each quarter resulting in all being opened once every five years. Three of the 12 should be sampled and results reported before opening any of the canisters. Water vapor and pressure should be measured as well as the current hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen. Then all 12 canisters should be opened for physical evaluation of the plate conditions and correlation with the sample measurements. The getters should be replaced at each inspection ensuring that no getter is used more than five years. The data should be analyzed each year and a conclusion made on the adequacy of the surveillance procedure and modifications made if it is inadequate.},
doi = {10.2172/911933},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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