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Title: Hot Hydrogen Test Facility

Abstract

The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
911907
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-06-11610
TRN: US0800206
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Space Technology and Applications International Forum STAIF-2007,Albuquerque, NM,02/11/2007,02/17/2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 - ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; COATINGS; COMPATIBILITY; DATA ACQUISITION; HYDROGEN; MOLECULAR WEIGHT; NUCLEAR CORES; PERFORMANCE; ROCKETS; TEMPERATURE CONTROL; TESTING; hydrogen; nuclear thermal rocket; testing

Citation Formats

W. David Swank. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
W. David Swank. Hot Hydrogen Test Facility. United States.
W. David Swank. Thu . "Hot Hydrogen Test Facility". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911907.
@article{osti_911907,
title = {Hot Hydrogen Test Facility},
author = {W. David Swank},
abstractNote = {The core in a nuclear thermal rocket will operate at high temperatures and in hydrogen. One of the important parameters in evaluating the performance of a nuclear thermal rocket is specific impulse, ISp. This quantity is proportional to the square root of the propellant’s absolute temperature and inversely proportional to square root of its molecular weight. Therefore, high temperature hydrogen is a favored propellant of nuclear thermal rocket designers. Previous work has shown that one of the life-limiting phenomena for thermal rocket nuclear cores is mass loss of fuel to flowing hydrogen at high temperatures. The hot hydrogen test facility located at the Idaho National Lab (INL) is designed to test suitability of different core materials in 2500°C hydrogen flowing at 1500 liters per minute. The facility is intended to test non-uranium containing materials and therefore is particularly suited for testing potential cladding and coating materials. In this first installment the facility is described. Automated Data acquisition, flow and temperature control, vessel compatibility with various core geometries and overall capabilities are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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