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Title: THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A GAS TEST LOOP SYSTEM

Abstract

This paper discusses thermal hydraulic calculations for a Gas Test Loop (GTL) system designed to provide a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for testing fuels and materials for advanced concept nuclear reactors. To assess the performance of candidate reactor fuels, these fuels must be irradiated under actual fast reactor flux conditions and operating environments, preferably in an existing irradiation facility [1]. Potential users of the GTL include the Generation IV Reactor Program, the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Space Nuclear Programs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - NE
OSTI Identifier:
911625
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-05-00446
TRN: US0800048
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ANS 2005 Winter Meeting,Washington, DC,11/13/2005,11/17/2005
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 - SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; FAST REACTORS; FUEL CYCLE; IRRADIATION; NUCLEAR FUELS; PERFORMANCE; REACTORS; TESTING; THERMAL HYDRAULICS; Gas Test Loop, thermal hydraulics, RELAP5

Citation Formats

Donna Post Guillen, and James E. Fisher. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A GAS TEST LOOP SYSTEM. United States: N. p., 2005. Web.
Donna Post Guillen, & James E. Fisher. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A GAS TEST LOOP SYSTEM. United States.
Donna Post Guillen, and James E. Fisher. Tue . "THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A GAS TEST LOOP SYSTEM". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/911625.
@article{osti_911625,
title = {THERMAL HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS OF A GAS TEST LOOP SYSTEM},
author = {Donna Post Guillen and James E. Fisher},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses thermal hydraulic calculations for a Gas Test Loop (GTL) system designed to provide a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for testing fuels and materials for advanced concept nuclear reactors. To assess the performance of candidate reactor fuels, these fuels must be irradiated under actual fast reactor flux conditions and operating environments, preferably in an existing irradiation facility [1]. Potential users of the GTL include the Generation IV Reactor Program, the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Space Nuclear Programs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005},
month = {Tue Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 2005}
}

Conference:
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