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Title: Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics

Abstract

Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film depositionmore » by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for laser acoustics shall be discussed drawing from examples in materials science, microelectronic and nuclear fields.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Laboratory (INL)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - EE
OSTI Identifier:
910831
Report Number(s):
INEEL/CON-04-01559
TRN: US0800561
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC07-99ID-13727
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2004 IEEE International Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control,Montreal, Canada,08/24/2004,08/27/2004
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 - MATERIALS SCIENCE, 46 - INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACOUSTICS; AMPLITUDES; DETECTION; FABRICATION; FRACTURES; FREQUENCY CONTROL; IMPLEMENTATION; LASERS; MICROELECTRONICS; PLASMA; PROCESSING; RADIATIONS; SINTERING; THIN FILMS; ULTRASONIC WAVES

Citation Formats

Ken L. Telschow. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics. United States: N. p., 2004. Web.
Ken L. Telschow. Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics. United States.
Ken L. Telschow. Sun . "Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/910831.
@article{osti_910831,
title = {Material Property Measurement in Hostile Environments using Laser Acoustics},
author = {Ken L. Telschow},
abstractNote = {Acoustic methods are well known and have been used to measure various intrinsic material properties, such as, elastic coefficients, density, crystal axis orientation, microstructural texture, and residual stress. Extrinsic properties, such as, dimensions, motion variables or temperature are also readily determined from acoustic methods. Laser acoustics, employing optical generation and detection of elastic waves, has a unique advantage over other acoustic methods—it is noncontacting, uses the sample surface itself for transduction, requires no couplant or invasive sample surface preparation and can be utilized in any hostile environment allowing optical access to the sample surface. In addition, optical generation and detection probe beams can be focused to the micron scale and/or shaped to alter the transduction process with a degree of control not possible using contact transduction methods. Laser methods are amenable to both continuous wave and pulse-echo measurements and have been used from Hz to 100’s of GHz (time scales from sec to psec) and with amplitudes sufficient to fracture materials. This paper shall review recent applications of laser acoustic methods to determining material properties in hostile environments that preclude the use of contacting transduction techniques. Example environments include high temperature (>1000C) sintering and molten metal processing, thin film deposition by plasma techniques, materials moving at high velocity during the fabrication process and nuclear high radiation regions. Recent technological advances in solid-state lasers and telecommunications have greatly aided the development and implementation of laser acoustic methods, particularly at ultra high frequencies. Consequently, laser acoustic material property measurements exhibit high precision and reproducibility today. In addition, optical techniques provide methods of imaging acoustic motion that is both quantitative and rapid. Possible future directions for laser acoustics shall be discussed drawing from examples in materials science, microelectronic and nuclear fields.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Sun Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}

Conference:
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