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Title: Low-Temperature Ultrafast Mobility in Systems with Long-Range Repulsive Interactions: Pb/Si(111)

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
910277
Report Number(s):
IS-J 7217
Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007; PRLTAO; TRN: US200723%%395
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 98; Journal Issue: 13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; LEAD; SILICON; ELECTRON MOBILITY

Citation Formats

M. Yakes, M. Hupalo, M.A. Zaluska-Kotur, Z.W. Gortel, and M.C. Tringides. Low-Temperature Ultrafast Mobility in Systems with Long-Range Repulsive Interactions: Pb/Si(111). United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.135504.
M. Yakes, M. Hupalo, M.A. Zaluska-Kotur, Z.W. Gortel, & M.C. Tringides. Low-Temperature Ultrafast Mobility in Systems with Long-Range Repulsive Interactions: Pb/Si(111). United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.135504.
M. Yakes, M. Hupalo, M.A. Zaluska-Kotur, Z.W. Gortel, and M.C. Tringides. Fri . "Low-Temperature Ultrafast Mobility in Systems with Long-Range Repulsive Interactions: Pb/Si(111)". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.135504.
@article{osti_910277,
title = {Low-Temperature Ultrafast Mobility in Systems with Long-Range Repulsive Interactions: Pb/Si(111)},
author = {M. Yakes and M. Hupalo and M.A. Zaluska-Kotur and Z.W. Gortel and M.C. Tringides},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.135504},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri Mar 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • A realization of the numerous phases predicted in systems with long-range repulsive interactions was recently found in Pb/Si(111). Surprisingly, these numerous phases can be grown at low temperatures {approx}40 K over macroscopic distances. This unusual observation can be explained from theoretical calculations of the collective diffusion coefficient D{sub c} in systems with long-range repulsive interactions. Instead of a gradual dependence of D{sub c} on coverage, it was found that D{sub c} has sharp maxima at low temperatures for every stable phase (i.e., for every rational value of the coverage {theta}=p/q) in agreement with the experiment.
  • We report on the first successful attempt to apply the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo technique to the calculation of ground-state properties of systems of many electrons interacting via a Coulomb potential. We have been able to substantially reduce the huge statistical fluctuations arising from the repulsive, long-range character of the interactions, which had so far hindered the application of this method to [ital realistic] Hamiltonians for atoms, molecules, and solids. Our technique is demonstrated with calculations of ground-state properties of the simplest molecular and solid-state systems, i.e., the H[sub 2] molecule and the homogeneous electron gas.
  • No abstract prepared.
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