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Title: HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

Abstract

Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerablemore » reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
909954
Report Number(s):
BNL-77900-2007-IR
R&D Project: 05171; EB4005030; TRN: US200723%%297
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; BRINES; CALCITE; CAPITAL; CARBON STEELS; CLEANING; COATINGS; CORROSION; ECONOMICS; GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANTS; MAINTENANCE; OXIDATION; SCHEDULES; SILICA; STAINLESS STEELS; TITANIUM ALLOYS

Citation Formats

SUGAMA,T. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/909954.
SUGAMA,T. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS. United States. doi:10.2172/909954.
SUGAMA,T. Mon . "HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS". United States. doi:10.2172/909954. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909954.
@article{osti_909954,
title = {HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS},
author = {SUGAMA,T.},
abstractNote = {Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.},
doi = {10.2172/909954},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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