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Title: RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

Abstract

The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
909953
Report Number(s):
BNL-77899-2007-IR
R&D Project: 05171; EB4005030; TRN: US200723%%296
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; CONCRETES; DESIGN; FLOORS; LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS; POLYMERS; REPAIR; MATERIALS

Citation Formats

SUGAMA,T. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/909953.
SUGAMA,T. RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.. United States. doi:10.2172/909953.
SUGAMA,T. Mon . "RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.". United States. doi:10.2172/909953. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909953.
@article{osti_909953,
title = {RESTORING A DAMAGED 16-YEAR -OLD INSULATING POLYMER CONCRETE DIKE OVERLAY: REPAIR MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES.},
author = {SUGAMA,T.},
abstractNote = {The objective of this program was to design and formulate organic polymer-based material systems suitable for repairing and restoring the overlay panels of insulating lightweight polymer concrete (ILPC) from the concrete floor and slope wall of a dike at KeySpan liquefied natural gas (LNG) facility in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, just over sixteen years ago. It also included undertaking a small-scale field demonstration to ensure that the commercial repairing technologies were applicable to the designed and formulated materials.},
doi = {10.2172/909953},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Earlier GRI-sponsored work at Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the development and utilization of insulating polymer concrete composites (IPC) as a means of reducing the evaporation rate of liquified natural gas in the event of a spill into a containment dike, thereby improving the safety at these sites. Although all of the required properties can be attained with the IPC, it was estimated that a low-cost replacement for the expensive organic binder would be necessary before use of the material would be cost-effective. In the current program, several latex modified cement formulations were evaluated and the most promising onemore » identified. A mixture of two carboxylated styrene-butadiene latexes was selected for use in detailed laboratory property characterizations and a subsequent field evaluation. When compared to the properties of IPC, the latex-modified insulating materials display somewhat higher thermal conductivities, greater permeability to water, and reduced strength. However, these properties still meet most of the performance criteria, and the unit cost of the material is less than one-fifth that of IPC made with epoxy binders. When installed as a 0.75-in. thick overlay, material costs are estimated to be $1.00/ft{sup 2}.« less
  • Earlier GRI-sponsored work at Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the development and utilization of insulating polymer concrete composites (IPC) as a means of reducing the evaporation rate of liquified natural gas in the event of a spill into a containment dike, thereby improving the safety at these sites. Although all of the required properties can be attained with the IPC, it was estimated that a low-cost replacement for the expensive organic binder would be necessary before use of the material would be cost-effective. In the current program, several latex modified cement formulations were evaluated and the most promising onemore » identified. A mixture of two carboxylated styrene-butadiene latexes was selected for use in detailed laboratory property characterizations and a subsequent field evaluation. When compared to the properties of IPC, the latex-modified insulating materials display somewhat higher thermal conductivities, greater permeability to water, and reduced strength. However, these properties still meet most of the performance criteria, and the unit cost of the material is less than one-fifth that of IPC made with epoxy binders. When installed as a 0.75-in. thick overlay, material costs are estimated to be $1.00/ft{sup 2}.« less
  • Insulating polymer concrete (IPC) composites have been developed for use as a dike insulation material at Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) storage facilities. Using inert, low density multicellular glass and/or ceramic macrospheres with unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins, a lightweight insulating polymer concrete has been made. Installation of IPC as an overlay on a concrete substrate has been shown to be a practical method of insulating LNG storage tank containment dikes. In many cases, the impounding dikes have compacted earthen or crushed stone surfaces. In these cases, the cost and time required to install a concrete substrate could be eliminated ifmore » the IPC can be installed by spraying or shotcretting it directly on the earthen or crushed stone surfaces. An evaluation was made of shotcretting IPC directly onto earthen and crushed stone surfaces using a polymer shotcrete machine. Shotcrete installations were made on sloped and vertical surfaces. In all cases, machine application was made without technical difficulty. Polymer shotcrete technology was shown to be technically feasible for IPC applications to a variety of substrates and surface geometries. Cost estimates indicate that IPC shotcrete applications can be almost 30% less than the installation of a concrete substrate with an IPC overlay.« less
  • An insulating polymer concrete (IPC) composite has been developed for possible use as a dike insulation material at Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) storage facilities. Using hermetically sealed glass nodules or expanded perlite aggregates and unsaturated polyester resins, a new class of lightweight polymer concretes can be manufactured. Two application procedures have been identified and shown to be feasible in laboratory studies. Precast IPC composite panels 1-in thick can be bonded to concrete substrates using epoxy gel type adhesives or mortars. Cast-in-place IPC to concrete substrates have been shown to have good bonding and insulating characteristics. Modifications of the mix designmore » to improve the workability and sagging of the IPC for installation on vertical or sloped surfaces is necessary.« less
  • Insulating polymer concrete (IPC) composites were developed for use as a dike insulation material at Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) storage facilities. Using inert, low density spheres containing a multiplicity of minute independent closed air cells surrounded by a unique tough outer shell and unsaturated polyester or epoxy resins, a new class of lightweight polymer concretes can be manufactured. The IPC composites have low thermal conductivities ranging from 0.02 to 0.15 Btu/hr-ft-deg F over a temperature range of -235 to +90 deg F. With low water absorptions (<1%), these composites are impermeable to rain or snow. The low density app. 50more » lbs per cubic foot composites exhibit exceptionally high compressive strengths of 2600 to 3600 psi.« less