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Title: CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

Abstract

One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Doe - Office Of Science
OSTI Identifier:
909942
Report Number(s):
BNL-77678-2007-CP
R&D Project: 10514; NN2001030; TRN: US0704023
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: THIRD ANNUAL IEEE LONG ISLAND SYSTEMS APPLICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE (LISAT, 2007); INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, FARMINGDALE STATE UNIVERSITY, FARMINGDALE, NEW YORK; 20070504 through 20070504
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; BNL; NATIONAL SECURITY; PERFORMANCE; PROLIFERATION; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; SECURITY; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; NUCLEAR MATERIALS MANAGEMENT

Citation Formats

CAMARDA,G.S., BOLOTNIKOV, A.E., CUI, Y., HOSSAIN, A., KOHMAN, K.T., and JAMES, R.B. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
CAMARDA,G.S., BOLOTNIKOV, A.E., CUI, Y., HOSSAIN, A., KOHMAN, K.T., & JAMES, R.B. CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.. United States.
CAMARDA,G.S., BOLOTNIKOV, A.E., CUI, Y., HOSSAIN, A., KOHMAN, K.T., and JAMES, R.B. Fri . "CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909942.
@article{osti_909942,
title = {CDZNTE ROOM-TEMPERATURE SEMICONDUCTOR GAMMA-RAY DETECTOR FOR NATIONAL-SECURITY APPLICATIONS.},
author = {CAMARDA,G.S. and BOLOTNIKOV, A.E. and CUI, Y. and HOSSAIN, A. and KOHMAN, K.T. and JAMES, R.B.},
abstractNote = {One important mission of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration is to develop reliable gamma-ray detectors to meet the widespread needs of users for effective techniques to detect and identify special nuclear- and radioactive-materials. Accordingly, the Nonproliferation and National Security Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked to evaluate existing technology and to develop improved room-temperature detectors based on semiconductors, such as CdZnTe (CZT). Our research covers two important areas: Improving the quality of CZT material, and exploring new CZT-based gamma-ray detectors. In this paper, we report on our recent findings from the material characterization and tests of actual CZT devices fabricated in our laboratory and from materials/detectors supplied by different commercial vendors. In particular, we emphasize the critical role of secondary phases in the current CZT material and issues in fabricating the CZT detectors, both of which affect their performance.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Fri May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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