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Title: The technology benefits of inertial confinement fusion research

Abstract

The development and demonstration of inertial fusion is incredibly challenging because it requires simultaneously controlling and precisely measuring parameters at extreme values in energy, space, and time. The challenges range from building megajoule (10{sup 6} J) drivers that perform with percent-level precision to fabricating targets with submicron specifications to measuring target performance at micron scale (10{sup {minus}6} m) with picosecond (10{sup {minus}12} s) time resolution. Over the past 30 years in attempting to meet this challenge, the inertial fusion community around the world has invented new technologies in lasers, particle beams, pulse power drivers, diagnostics, target fabrication, and other areas. These technologies have found applications in diverse fields of industry and science. Moreover, simply assembling the teams with the background, experience, and personal drive to meet the challenging requirements of inertial fusion has led to spin-offs in unexpected directions, for example, in laser isotope separation, extreme ultraviolet lithography for microelectronics, compact and inexpensive radars, advanced laser materials processing, and medical technology. The experience of inertial fusion research and development of spinning off technologies has not been unique to any one laboratory or country but has been similar in main research centers in the US, Europe, and Japan. Strengthening and broadeningmore » the inertial fusion effort to focus on creating a new source of electrical power (inertial fusion energy [IFE]) that is economically competitive and environmentally benign will yield rich rewards in technology spin-offs. The additional challenges presented by IFE are to make drivers affordable, efficient, and long-lived while operating at a repetition rate of a few Hertz; to make fusion targets that perform consistently at high-fusion yield; and to create target chambers that can repetitively handle greater than 100-MJ yields while producing minimal radioactive by-products. Meeting these challenges will produce spin-off value of enormous magnitude. By exploring the technology spin-offs of the inertial fusion community to date, we can glimpse the expected future rewards from an IFE program.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
9099
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-134137
TRN: US0102746
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 26 May 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ICF DEVICES; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS; LASER ISOTOPE SEPARATION; LASER MATERIALS; PARTICLE BEAMS; TARGET CHAMBERS; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; THERMONUCLEAR REACTORS

Citation Formats

Powell, H T. The technology benefits of inertial confinement fusion research. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/9099.
Powell, H T. The technology benefits of inertial confinement fusion research. United States. doi:10.2172/9099.
Powell, H T. Wed . "The technology benefits of inertial confinement fusion research". United States. doi:10.2172/9099. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/9099.
@article{osti_9099,
title = {The technology benefits of inertial confinement fusion research},
author = {Powell, H T},
abstractNote = {The development and demonstration of inertial fusion is incredibly challenging because it requires simultaneously controlling and precisely measuring parameters at extreme values in energy, space, and time. The challenges range from building megajoule (10{sup 6} J) drivers that perform with percent-level precision to fabricating targets with submicron specifications to measuring target performance at micron scale (10{sup {minus}6} m) with picosecond (10{sup {minus}12} s) time resolution. Over the past 30 years in attempting to meet this challenge, the inertial fusion community around the world has invented new technologies in lasers, particle beams, pulse power drivers, diagnostics, target fabrication, and other areas. These technologies have found applications in diverse fields of industry and science. Moreover, simply assembling the teams with the background, experience, and personal drive to meet the challenging requirements of inertial fusion has led to spin-offs in unexpected directions, for example, in laser isotope separation, extreme ultraviolet lithography for microelectronics, compact and inexpensive radars, advanced laser materials processing, and medical technology. The experience of inertial fusion research and development of spinning off technologies has not been unique to any one laboratory or country but has been similar in main research centers in the US, Europe, and Japan. Strengthening and broadening the inertial fusion effort to focus on creating a new source of electrical power (inertial fusion energy [IFE]) that is economically competitive and environmentally benign will yield rich rewards in technology spin-offs. The additional challenges presented by IFE are to make drivers affordable, efficient, and long-lived while operating at a repetition rate of a few Hertz; to make fusion targets that perform consistently at high-fusion yield; and to create target chambers that can repetitively handle greater than 100-MJ yields while producing minimal radioactive by-products. Meeting these challenges will produce spin-off value of enormous magnitude. By exploring the technology spin-offs of the inertial fusion community to date, we can glimpse the expected future rewards from an IFE program.},
doi = {10.2172/9099},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {5}
}

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