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Title: Remote Operations for LHC and CMS

Abstract

Commissioning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments will be a vital part of the worldwide high energy physics program beginning in 2007. A remote operations center has been built at Fermilab to contribute to commissioning and operations of the LHC and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and to develop new capabilities for real-time data analysis and monitoring for LHC, CMS, and grid computing. Remote operations will also be essential to a future International Linear Collider with its multiple, internationally distributed control rooms. In this paper we present an overview of Fermilab's LHC@FNAL remote operations center for LHC and CMS, describe what led up to the development of the center, and describe noteworthy features of the center.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909897
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-07-124-E
TRN: US0703998
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at 15th IEEE Real Time Conference 2007 (RT 07), Batavia, Illinois, 29 Apr - 4 May 2007.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS, 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE, 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; COMMISSIONING; CONTROL ROOMS; DATA ANALYSIS; FERMILAB; HADRONS; HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS; LINEAR COLLIDERS; MONITORING; MUONS; SOLENOIDS; REMOTE CONTROL; Accelerators, Computing, Instrumentation

Citation Formats

Gottschalk, E.E., and /Fermilab. Remote Operations for LHC and CMS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Gottschalk, E.E., & /Fermilab. Remote Operations for LHC and CMS. United States.
Gottschalk, E.E., and /Fermilab. Sun . "Remote Operations for LHC and CMS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909897.
@article{osti_909897,
title = {Remote Operations for LHC and CMS},
author = {Gottschalk, E.E. and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {Commissioning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments will be a vital part of the worldwide high energy physics program beginning in 2007. A remote operations center has been built at Fermilab to contribute to commissioning and operations of the LHC and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and to develop new capabilities for real-time data analysis and monitoring for LHC, CMS, and grid computing. Remote operations will also be essential to a future International Linear Collider with its multiple, internationally distributed control rooms. In this paper we present an overview of Fermilab's LHC@FNAL remote operations center for LHC and CMS, describe what led up to the development of the center, and describe noteworthy features of the center.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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