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Title: Using Feedback to Control Deadtime in the CDF Trigger System

Abstract

The CDF experiment uses a three-level trigger system to select events produced during p{bar p} collisions. As the luminosity of the Tevatron accelerator falls by a factor of four over a 24 hour period, trigger selections are adjusted automatically in order to make full use of the data processing bandwidth. The selections are made to maximize high purity triggers and keep the deadtime as low as possible at any given luminosity throughout the entire course of a run. We describe the algorithms used to obtain these goals and how the changing conditions are accounted for in the analysis of the data.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909893
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-07-126-E
TRN: US0703995
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at 15th IEEE Real Time Conference 2007 (RT 07), Batavia, Illinois, 29 Apr - 4 May 2007.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ACCELERATORS; ALGORITHMS; DATA PROCESSING; FEEDBACK; FERMILAB COLLIDER DETECTOR; FERMILAB TEVATRON; LUMINOSITY; Instrumentation

Citation Formats

Torretta, D., and /Fermilab. Using Feedback to Control Deadtime in the CDF Trigger System. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Torretta, D., & /Fermilab. Using Feedback to Control Deadtime in the CDF Trigger System. United States.
Torretta, D., and /Fermilab. Sun . "Using Feedback to Control Deadtime in the CDF Trigger System". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909893.
@article{osti_909893,
title = {Using Feedback to Control Deadtime in the CDF Trigger System},
author = {Torretta, D. and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {The CDF experiment uses a three-level trigger system to select events produced during p{bar p} collisions. As the luminosity of the Tevatron accelerator falls by a factor of four over a 24 hour period, trigger selections are adjusted automatically in order to make full use of the data processing bandwidth. The selections are made to maximize high purity triggers and keep the deadtime as low as possible at any given luminosity throughout the entire course of a run. We describe the algorithms used to obtain these goals and how the changing conditions are accounted for in the analysis of the data.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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