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Title: Studies of dynamic properties of shock compressed single crystals by in situ dynamic x-ray diffraction and sample recovery

Abstract

Laser compression provides pressures ranging from a few to hundreds of GPa at pulse durations of the order of nanoseconds or fractions thereof. The short duration ensures a rapid decay of the pulse and quenching of shocked sample in times that are orders of magnitude lower than in conventional explosively driven plate impact experiments. Systematic experiments carried out in specimens well suited for transmission electron microscopy characterization are revealing that laser compression, by virtue of a much more rapid cooling, enables the retention of a deformation structure closer to the one existing during shock. The smaller pulse length decreases the propensity for localization. Copper and copper aluminum (2 and 6 wt% Al) with orientations [001] and [ ] were subjected to high intensity laser pulses with energy levels of 70 to 300 J delivered in a pulse duration of approximately 3 ns. Systematic differences of the defect substructure were observed as a function of pressure and stacking fault energy. The changes in the mechanical properties for each condition were compared using micro- and nano-hardness measurements and correlated well with observations of the defect substructure. Three regimes of plastic deformation were identified and their transitions modeled: dislocation cells, stacking faults, andmore » twins. An existing constitutive description of the slip to twinning transition, based on the critical shear stress, was expanded to incorporate the effect of stacking-fault energy. A new physically-based criterion accounting for stacking fault energy was developed that describes the transition from perfect loop to partial loop homogeneous nucleation, and consequently from cells to stacking faults. These calculations predict transitions that are in qualitative agreement with the effect of SFE.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
909884
Report Number(s):
DOE-FG03-03SF22694
TRN: US0805842
DOE Contract Number:  
FG03-03SF22694
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ENERGY LEVELS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; STACKING FAULTS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; MONOCRYSTALS; Shock Compression, Laser Shock, Copper, Single Crystal

Citation Formats

Meyers, Marc A., Schneider, M. S., Jarmakani, H., Kad, B., Remington, B. A., Kalantar, D. H., McNaney, J., Cao, B., Belak, J., E Bringa, G. Collins, Paisley, D., Holian, B., Lomdahl, P., Boehly, T. R, and Wark, J. Studies of dynamic properties of shock compressed single crystals by in situ dynamic x-ray diffraction and sample recovery. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/909884.
Meyers, Marc A., Schneider, M. S., Jarmakani, H., Kad, B., Remington, B. A., Kalantar, D. H., McNaney, J., Cao, B., Belak, J., E Bringa, G. Collins, Paisley, D., Holian, B., Lomdahl, P., Boehly, T. R, & Wark, J. Studies of dynamic properties of shock compressed single crystals by in situ dynamic x-ray diffraction and sample recovery. United States. doi:10.2172/909884.
Meyers, Marc A., Schneider, M. S., Jarmakani, H., Kad, B., Remington, B. A., Kalantar, D. H., McNaney, J., Cao, B., Belak, J., E Bringa, G. Collins, Paisley, D., Holian, B., Lomdahl, P., Boehly, T. R, and Wark, J. Sat . "Studies of dynamic properties of shock compressed single crystals by in situ dynamic x-ray diffraction and sample recovery". United States. doi:10.2172/909884. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909884.
@article{osti_909884,
title = {Studies of dynamic properties of shock compressed single crystals by in situ dynamic x-ray diffraction and sample recovery},
author = {Meyers, Marc A. and Schneider, M. S. and Jarmakani, H. and Kad, B. and Remington, B. A. and Kalantar, D. H. and McNaney, J. and Cao, B. and Belak, J. and E Bringa, G. Collins and Paisley, D. and Holian, B. and Lomdahl, P. and Boehly, T. R and Wark, J.},
abstractNote = {Laser compression provides pressures ranging from a few to hundreds of GPa at pulse durations of the order of nanoseconds or fractions thereof. The short duration ensures a rapid decay of the pulse and quenching of shocked sample in times that are orders of magnitude lower than in conventional explosively driven plate impact experiments. Systematic experiments carried out in specimens well suited for transmission electron microscopy characterization are revealing that laser compression, by virtue of a much more rapid cooling, enables the retention of a deformation structure closer to the one existing during shock. The smaller pulse length decreases the propensity for localization. Copper and copper aluminum (2 and 6 wt% Al) with orientations [001] and [ ] were subjected to high intensity laser pulses with energy levels of 70 to 300 J delivered in a pulse duration of approximately 3 ns. Systematic differences of the defect substructure were observed as a function of pressure and stacking fault energy. The changes in the mechanical properties for each condition were compared using micro- and nano-hardness measurements and correlated well with observations of the defect substructure. Three regimes of plastic deformation were identified and their transitions modeled: dislocation cells, stacking faults, and twins. An existing constitutive description of the slip to twinning transition, based on the critical shear stress, was expanded to incorporate the effect of stacking-fault energy. A new physically-based criterion accounting for stacking fault energy was developed that describes the transition from perfect loop to partial loop homogeneous nucleation, and consequently from cells to stacking faults. These calculations predict transitions that are in qualitative agreement with the effect of SFE.},
doi = {10.2172/909884},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2007},
month = {5}
}