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Title: Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive

Abstract

The purpose of this project is to organize the databases/information and organize and move the tissues from the long-term dog (4,000 dogs) and mouse (over 30,000 mice) radiation experiments done at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1970's and 80's to Northwestern University. These studies were done with the intention of understanding the effects of exposure to radiation at a variety of different doses, dose-rates, and radiation qualities on end-points such as life-shortening, carcinogenesis, cause of death, shifts in disease incidence and other biological parameters. Organ and tissue samples from these animals including cancers, metastases and other significant degenerative and inflammatory lesions and those in a regular protocol of normal tissues were preserved in paraffin blocks, tissue impressions and sections and represent a great resource for the radiation biology community. These collections are particularly significant since these experiments are not likely to be repeated because of the extreme cost of monies and time for such large-scale animal studies. The long-term goal is to make these tissues and databases available to the wider scientific community so that questions such as tissue sensitivity, early and late effects, low dose and protracted dose responses of normal and tumor tissues, etc. can be examined andmore » defined. Recent advances in biology particularly at the subcellular and molecular level now permit microarray-based gene expression array analyses from paraffin-embedded tissues (where RNA samples are significantly degraded), synchrotron-based studies of metal and other elemental distribution patterns in tissues, PCR-based analyses for mutation detection, and other similar approaches that were not available when the long¬ term animal studies were designed and initiated. Understanding the basis and progression of radiation damage should also permit rational approaches to prevention and mitigation of those damages. Therefore, as stated earlier, these tissues and their related documentation, represent a significant resource for future studies. For this project, we propose to accomplish the following objectives: (1) inventory and organize the tissues, blood smears, wet-tissues and paper-¬based information that is available in the tissue bank at Argonne National Laboratory; (2) convert the existing Oracle database of the mouse studies to MS Access( the dog data is already in this format which is far more user friendly and widely used in business and research) , (3) move the remaining samples and documentation from dogs that had been transferred from ANL to New Mexico (in Dr. F. Hahn's care) to Northwestern University and add these to the inventory; (4) move the tissues and Access database at Argonne National Laboratory to Northwestern University.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Northwestern University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
909871
Report Number(s):
DOE/F4600.1 (8-93)
TRN: US200820%%416
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-04ER63920
Resource Type:
Other
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ANIMALS; BIOLOGY; BLOOD; BUSINESS; CARCINOGENESIS; DEATH; DETECTION; DISEASE INCIDENCE; DOSE RATES; GENES; LIFE SPAN; METASTASES; MICE; MITIGATION; MUTATIONS; NEOPLASMS; ORGANS; PARAFFIN; RADIATIONS; RNA; SENSITIVITY; tissue archive, model organisms, effects of irradiation, fission neutrons, gamma rays

Citation Formats

Gayle Woloschak. Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Gayle Woloschak. Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive. United States.
Gayle Woloschak. Sun . "Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909871.
@article{osti_909871,
title = {Tissues from the irradiated dog/mouse archive},
author = {Gayle Woloschak},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this project is to organize the databases/information and organize and move the tissues from the long-term dog (4,000 dogs) and mouse (over 30,000 mice) radiation experiments done at Argonne National Laboratory during the 1970's and 80's to Northwestern University. These studies were done with the intention of understanding the effects of exposure to radiation at a variety of different doses, dose-rates, and radiation qualities on end-points such as life-shortening, carcinogenesis, cause of death, shifts in disease incidence and other biological parameters. Organ and tissue samples from these animals including cancers, metastases and other significant degenerative and inflammatory lesions and those in a regular protocol of normal tissues were preserved in paraffin blocks, tissue impressions and sections and represent a great resource for the radiation biology community. These collections are particularly significant since these experiments are not likely to be repeated because of the extreme cost of monies and time for such large-scale animal studies. The long-term goal is to make these tissues and databases available to the wider scientific community so that questions such as tissue sensitivity, early and late effects, low dose and protracted dose responses of normal and tumor tissues, etc. can be examined and defined. Recent advances in biology particularly at the subcellular and molecular level now permit microarray-based gene expression array analyses from paraffin-embedded tissues (where RNA samples are significantly degraded), synchrotron-based studies of metal and other elemental distribution patterns in tissues, PCR-based analyses for mutation detection, and other similar approaches that were not available when the long¬ term animal studies were designed and initiated. Understanding the basis and progression of radiation damage should also permit rational approaches to prevention and mitigation of those damages. Therefore, as stated earlier, these tissues and their related documentation, represent a significant resource for future studies. For this project, we propose to accomplish the following objectives: (1) inventory and organize the tissues, blood smears, wet-tissues and paper-¬based information that is available in the tissue bank at Argonne National Laboratory; (2) convert the existing Oracle database of the mouse studies to MS Access( the dog data is already in this format which is far more user friendly and widely used in business and research) , (3) move the remaining samples and documentation from dogs that had been transferred from ANL to New Mexico (in Dr. F. Hahn's care) to Northwestern University and add these to the inventory; (4) move the tissues and Access database at Argonne National Laboratory to Northwestern University.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}