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Title: DERIVATIONS FOR HOOP STRESSES DUE TO SHOCK WAVES IN A TUBE

Abstract

Equations describing the hoop stresses in a pipe due to water hammer have been presented in the literature in a series of papers, and this paper discusses the complete derivation of the pertinent equation. The derivation considers the pipe wall response to a water hammer induced shock wave moving along the inner wall of the pipe. Factors such as fluid properties, pipe wall materials, pipe dimensions, and damping are considered. These factors are combined to present a single, albeit rather complicated, equation to describe the pipe wall vibrations and hoop stresses as a function of time. This equation is also compared to another theoretical prediction for hoop stresses, which is also derived herein. Specifically, the two theories predict different maximum stresses, and the differences between these predictions are graphically displayed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909863
Report Number(s):
PVP2007-26722
TRN: US200723%%56
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ASME Pressure Vessel and Piping Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; EQUATIONS; DAMPING; SHOCK WAVES; STRESSES; WATER HAMMER; PIPES; WALLS; WAVE PROPAGATION; MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

Citation Formats

Leishear, R. DERIVATIONS FOR HOOP STRESSES DUE TO SHOCK WAVES IN A TUBE. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Leishear, R. DERIVATIONS FOR HOOP STRESSES DUE TO SHOCK WAVES IN A TUBE. United States.
Leishear, R. Mon . "DERIVATIONS FOR HOOP STRESSES DUE TO SHOCK WAVES IN A TUBE". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909863.
@article{osti_909863,
title = {DERIVATIONS FOR HOOP STRESSES DUE TO SHOCK WAVES IN A TUBE},
author = {Leishear, R},
abstractNote = {Equations describing the hoop stresses in a pipe due to water hammer have been presented in the literature in a series of papers, and this paper discusses the complete derivation of the pertinent equation. The derivation considers the pipe wall response to a water hammer induced shock wave moving along the inner wall of the pipe. Factors such as fluid properties, pipe wall materials, pipe dimensions, and damping are considered. These factors are combined to present a single, albeit rather complicated, equation to describe the pipe wall vibrations and hoop stresses as a function of time. This equation is also compared to another theoretical prediction for hoop stresses, which is also derived herein. Specifically, the two theories predict different maximum stresses, and the differences between these predictions are graphically displayed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 30 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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