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Title: Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound

Abstract

The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use,more » 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909683
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-55324
400403309; TRN: US200723%%7
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2007 Georgia Basin Puget Sound Research Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia, March 26–29, 2007, 8 pages
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COLIFORMS; CONTAMINATION; MASS BALANCE; POLLUTANTS; PUGET SOUND; RUNOFF; SEDIMENTS; WATER QUALITY; WATERSHEDS; RAIN WATER; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Cullinan, Valerie I., May, Christopher W., Brandenberger, Jill M., Judd, Chaeli, and Johnston, Robert K. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Cullinan, Valerie I., May, Christopher W., Brandenberger, Jill M., Judd, Chaeli, & Johnston, Robert K. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound. United States.
Cullinan, Valerie I., May, Christopher W., Brandenberger, Jill M., Judd, Chaeli, and Johnston, Robert K. Thu . "Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909683.
@article{osti_909683,
title = {Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound},
author = {Cullinan, Valerie I. and May, Christopher W. and Brandenberger, Jill M. and Judd, Chaeli and Johnston, Robert K.},
abstractNote = {The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 29 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 29 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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