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Title: Modelling the impacts of climate policy on the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage across electric power regions in the United States

Abstract

This paper summarizes the results of a first-of-its-kind holistic, integrated economic analysis of the potential role of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies across the regional segments of the United States of America (USA) electric power sector, over the time frame 2005-2045, in response to two hypothetical emissions control policies analyzed against two potential energy supply futures that include updated and substantially higher projected prices for natural gas. A key feature of this paper’s analysis is an attempt to explicitly model the inherent heterogeneities that exist in both the nation’s current and future electricity generation infrastructure and candidate deep geologic CO2 storage formations. Overall, between 180 and 580 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle with CCS (IGCC+CCS) capacity is built by 2045 in these four scenarios, requiring between 12 and 41gigatons of CO2 (GtCO2) of storage in regional deep geologic reservoirs across the USA. Nearly all of this CO2 is from new IGCC+CCS systems, which start to deploy after 2025. Relatively little IGCC+CCS capacity is built before that time, primarily under unique niche opportunities. For the most part, CO2 emissions prices will likely need to be sustained at well over $10-20/ton CO2 before CCS begins tomore » deploy on a large scale within the electric power sector. Within these broad national trends, a highly nuanced picture of CCS deployment across the USA emerges. Across the four scenarios studied here, some North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions do not employ any CCS while others build more than 100 GW of CCS-enabled generation capacity. One region sees as much as 50% of their geologic CO2 storage reservoirs’ total theoretical capacity consumed by 2045, while the majority of the regions still have more than 90% of their potential storage capacity available to meet storage needs in the second half of the century and beyond.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909680
Report Number(s):
PNWD-SA-7449
TRN: US200723%%132
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 1(2):261-270; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; CAPACITY; CARBON DIOXIDE; CLIMATES; COMBINED CYCLES; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; ELECTRIC POWER; ELECTRIC RELIABILITY COUNCILS; NATURAL GAS; POTENTIAL ENERGY; STORAGE; USA; Carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage; electric power; climate change

Citation Formats

Wise, Marshall A., Dooley, James J., Dahowski, Robert T., and Davidson, Casie L. Modelling the impacts of climate policy on the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage across electric power regions in the United States. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1016/S1750-5836(07)00017-5.
Wise, Marshall A., Dooley, James J., Dahowski, Robert T., & Davidson, Casie L. Modelling the impacts of climate policy on the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage across electric power regions in the United States. United States. doi:10.1016/S1750-5836(07)00017-5.
Wise, Marshall A., Dooley, James J., Dahowski, Robert T., and Davidson, Casie L. Mon . "Modelling the impacts of climate policy on the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage across electric power regions in the United States". United States. doi:10.1016/S1750-5836(07)00017-5.
@article{osti_909680,
title = {Modelling the impacts of climate policy on the deployment of carbon dioxide capture and geologic storage across electric power regions in the United States},
author = {Wise, Marshall A. and Dooley, James J. and Dahowski, Robert T. and Davidson, Casie L.},
abstractNote = {This paper summarizes the results of a first-of-its-kind holistic, integrated economic analysis of the potential role of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies across the regional segments of the United States of America (USA) electric power sector, over the time frame 2005-2045, in response to two hypothetical emissions control policies analyzed against two potential energy supply futures that include updated and substantially higher projected prices for natural gas. A key feature of this paper’s analysis is an attempt to explicitly model the inherent heterogeneities that exist in both the nation’s current and future electricity generation infrastructure and candidate deep geologic CO2 storage formations. Overall, between 180 and 580 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle with CCS (IGCC+CCS) capacity is built by 2045 in these four scenarios, requiring between 12 and 41gigatons of CO2 (GtCO2) of storage in regional deep geologic reservoirs across the USA. Nearly all of this CO2 is from new IGCC+CCS systems, which start to deploy after 2025. Relatively little IGCC+CCS capacity is built before that time, primarily under unique niche opportunities. For the most part, CO2 emissions prices will likely need to be sustained at well over $10-20/ton CO2 before CCS begins to deploy on a large scale within the electric power sector. Within these broad national trends, a highly nuanced picture of CCS deployment across the USA emerges. Across the four scenarios studied here, some North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions do not employ any CCS while others build more than 100 GW of CCS-enabled generation capacity. One region sees as much as 50% of their geologic CO2 storage reservoirs’ total theoretical capacity consumed by 2045, while the majority of the regions still have more than 90% of their potential storage capacity available to meet storage needs in the second half of the century and beyond.},
doi = {10.1016/S1750-5836(07)00017-5},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 1(2):261-270},
number = 2,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}