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Title: Radiation Effects in a Model Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal

Abstract

The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. In this paper, we discuss the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909668
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-53726
Journal ID: ISSN 1047-4838; JOMMER; 3534b; 8208; KC0201020; TRN: US0703954
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: JOM. The Journal of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, 59(4):32-35; Journal Volume: 59; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; ACTINIDES; CERAMICS; NUCLEAR FUELS; PLUTONIUM; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; ZIRCON; zircon; nuclear waste form; radiation damage; computer simulation; molecular dynamics; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Devanathan, Ram, and Weber, William J. Radiation Effects in a Model Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1007/s11837-007-0051-2.
Devanathan, Ram, & Weber, William J. Radiation Effects in a Model Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal. United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-007-0051-2.
Devanathan, Ram, and Weber, William J. Mon . "Radiation Effects in a Model Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal". United States. doi:10.1007/s11837-007-0051-2.
@article{osti_909668,
title = {Radiation Effects in a Model Ceramic for Nuclear Waste Disposal},
author = {Devanathan, Ram and Weber, William J.},
abstractNote = {The safe immobilization of nuclear waste in geological repositories is one of the major scientific challenges facing humanity today. Crystalline ceramics hold the promise of locking up actinides from nuclear fuel and excess weapons plutonium in their structure thereby isolating them from the environment. In this paper, we discuss the atomistic details of radiation damage in a model ceramic, zircon.},
doi = {10.1007/s11837-007-0051-2},
journal = {JOM. The Journal of the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society, 59(4):32-35},
number = 4,
volume = 59,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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