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Title: CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS

Abstract

Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
909604
Report Number(s):
WSRC-STI-2007-00269
TRN: US200722%%1130
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 12th Wildlife Damage Management Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SWINE; ACCIDENTS; INJURIES; VEHICLES; SOUTH CAROLINA; POPULATION DYNAMICS; COST

Citation Formats

Mayer, J, and Paul E. Johns, P. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Mayer, J, & Paul E. Johns, P. CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS. United States.
Mayer, J, and Paul E. Johns, P. Wed . "CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/909604.
@article{osti_909604,
title = {CHARACTERIZATION OF WILD PIG VEHICLE COLLISIONS},
author = {Mayer, J and Paul E. Johns, P},
abstractNote = {Wild pig (Sus scrofa) collisions with vehicles are known to occur in the United States, but only minimal information describing these accidents has been reported. In an effort to better characterize these accidents, data were collected from 179 wild pig-vehicle collisions from a location in west central South Carolina. Data included accident parameters pertaining to the animals involved, time, location, and human impacts. The age structure of the animals involved was significantly older than that found in the population. Most collisions involved single animals; however, up to seven animals were involved in individual accidents. As the number of animals per collision increased, the age and body mass of the individuals involved decreased. The percentage of males was significantly higher in the single-animal accidents. Annual attrition due to vehicle collisions averaged 0.8 percent of the population. Wild pig-vehicle collisions occurred year-round and throughout the 24-hour daily time period. Most accidents were at night. The presence of lateral barriers was significantly more frequent at the collision locations. Human injuries were infrequent but potentially serious. The mean vehicle damage estimate was $1,173.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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