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Title: San Francisco State University IAC 02-06 Final Report

Abstract

The Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at San Francisco State University (SFSU) has served the cause of energy efficiency as a whole, and in particular for small and medium-sized manufacturing facilities in northern and central California, within a approximately 150 miles (radial) of San Francisco since 1992. In the current reporting period (September 1, 2002 through November 31, 2006) we have had major accomplishments, which include but are not limited to: - Performing a total of 94 energy efficiency and waste minimization audit days of 87 industrial plants - Recommending and analysis of 809 energy efficiency measures - Training 22 energy engineers, most of whom have joined energy services companies in California. - Disseminating energy efficiency information among local manufacturers - Acting as an information source for energy efficiency for local manufacturers and utilizes - Cooperating with local utilities and California Energy Commission in their energy efficiency projects - Performing various assignments by DOE such as dissemination of information on SEN initiative, conducting workshops on energy efficiency issues, contacting large energy user plants - Establishing a course on “Energy: Resources, Alternatives and Conservation” as a general education course at SFSU - Bringing energy issues to the attention of students in classrooms

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
San Francisco State University
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
908990
Report Number(s):
San Francisco State University IAC 02-06 Final Report
TRN: US0806207
DOE Contract Number:
FC36-02GO12085
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; AUDITS; CALIFORNIA; EDUCATION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; ENGINEERS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; MANUFACTURERS; MINIMIZATION; TRAINING; WASTES; IAC, SFSU, AUDIT, MANUFACTURING, ENERGY EFFICIENCY, ENERGY ASSESSMENT

Citation Formats

Ahmad R. Ganji, Ph.D., P.E., IAC DIrector. San Francisco State University IAC 02-06 Final Report. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/908990.
Ahmad R. Ganji, Ph.D., P.E., IAC DIrector. San Francisco State University IAC 02-06 Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/908990.
Ahmad R. Ganji, Ph.D., P.E., IAC DIrector. Mon . "San Francisco State University IAC 02-06 Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/908990. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908990.
@article{osti_908990,
title = {San Francisco State University IAC 02-06 Final Report},
author = {Ahmad R. Ganji, Ph.D., P.E., IAC DIrector},
abstractNote = {The Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at San Francisco State University (SFSU) has served the cause of energy efficiency as a whole, and in particular for small and medium-sized manufacturing facilities in northern and central California, within a approximately 150 miles (radial) of San Francisco since 1992. In the current reporting period (September 1, 2002 through November 31, 2006) we have had major accomplishments, which include but are not limited to: - Performing a total of 94 energy efficiency and waste minimization audit days of 87 industrial plants - Recommending and analysis of 809 energy efficiency measures - Training 22 energy engineers, most of whom have joined energy services companies in California. - Disseminating energy efficiency information among local manufacturers - Acting as an information source for energy efficiency for local manufacturers and utilizes - Cooperating with local utilities and California Energy Commission in their energy efficiency projects - Performing various assignments by DOE such as dissemination of information on SEN initiative, conducting workshops on energy efficiency issues, contacting large energy user plants - Establishing a course on “Energy: Resources, Alternatives and Conservation” as a general education course at SFSU - Bringing energy issues to the attention of students in classrooms},
doi = {10.2172/908990},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 05 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Technical Report:

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