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Title: Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals

Abstract

A novel functional imaging system for use in the imaging of unrestrained and non-anesthetized small animals or other subjects and a method for acquiring such images and further registering them with anatomical X-ray images previously or subsequently acquired. The apparatus comprises a combination of an IR laser profilometry system and gamma, PET and/or SPECT, imaging system, all mounted on a rotating gantry, that permits simultaneous acquisition of positional and orientational information and functional images of an unrestrained subject that are registered, i.e. integrated, using image processing software to produce a functional image of the subject without the use of restraints or anesthesia. The functional image thus obtained can be registered with a previously or subsequently obtained X-ray CT image of the subject. The use of the system described herein permits functional imaging of a subject in an unrestrained/non-anesthetized condition thereby reducing the stress on the subject and eliminating any potential interference with the functional testing that such stress might induce.

Inventors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Yorktown, VA
  2. Grafton, VA
  3. Knoxville, TN
  4. Knoxville, VA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Jefferson Solence Ass. LLC (Newport News, VA)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908986
Patent Number(s):
7,209,579
Application Number:
10/341,715
Assignee:
Jefferson Solence Ass. LLC (Newport News, VA) TJNAF
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84ER40150
Resource Type:
Patent
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Weisenberger, Andrew G, Majewski, Stanislaw, Paulus, Michael J, and Gleason, Shaun S. Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Weisenberger, Andrew G, Majewski, Stanislaw, Paulus, Michael J, & Gleason, Shaun S. Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals. United States.
Weisenberger, Andrew G, Majewski, Stanislaw, Paulus, Michael J, and Gleason, Shaun S. Tue . "Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908986.
@article{osti_908986,
title = {Anatomic and functional imaging of tagged molecules in animals},
author = {Weisenberger, Andrew G and Majewski, Stanislaw and Paulus, Michael J and Gleason, Shaun S},
abstractNote = {A novel functional imaging system for use in the imaging of unrestrained and non-anesthetized small animals or other subjects and a method for acquiring such images and further registering them with anatomical X-ray images previously or subsequently acquired. The apparatus comprises a combination of an IR laser profilometry system and gamma, PET and/or SPECT, imaging system, all mounted on a rotating gantry, that permits simultaneous acquisition of positional and orientational information and functional images of an unrestrained subject that are registered, i.e. integrated, using image processing software to produce a functional image of the subject without the use of restraints or anesthesia. The functional image thus obtained can be registered with a previously or subsequently obtained X-ray CT image of the subject. The use of the system described herein permits functional imaging of a subject in an unrestrained/non-anesthetized condition thereby reducing the stress on the subject and eliminating any potential interference with the functional testing that such stress might induce.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Patent:

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