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Title: Field and Bioassay Indicators for Internal Dose Intervention Therapy

Abstract

Guidance is presented that is used at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to identify the potential need for medical intervention in response to intakes of radioactivity. The guidance, based on ICRP Publication 30 models and committed effective dose equivalents of 20 mSv and 200 mSv, is expressed as numerical workplace measurements and derived first-day bioassay results for large intakes. It is used by facility radiation protection staff and on-call dosimetry support staff during the first few days following an intake.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908938
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-51604
TRN: US0703734
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Health Physics. Operational Radiation Safety, 92(5 Supp. 2):S123 - S126; Journal Volume: 92; Journal Issue: 5 Supp. 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; BIOASSAY; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; DOSIMETRY; RADIATION PROTECTION; RECOMMENDATIONS; INTERNAL IRRADIATION; THERAPY; bioassay; internal dosimetry; chelation

Citation Formats

Carbaugh, Eugene H. Field and Bioassay Indicators for Internal Dose Intervention Therapy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1097/01.HP.0000258922.82544.32.
Carbaugh, Eugene H. Field and Bioassay Indicators for Internal Dose Intervention Therapy. United States. doi:10.1097/01.HP.0000258922.82544.32.
Carbaugh, Eugene H. Tue . "Field and Bioassay Indicators for Internal Dose Intervention Therapy". United States. doi:10.1097/01.HP.0000258922.82544.32.
@article{osti_908938,
title = {Field and Bioassay Indicators for Internal Dose Intervention Therapy},
author = {Carbaugh, Eugene H.},
abstractNote = {Guidance is presented that is used at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site to identify the potential need for medical intervention in response to intakes of radioactivity. The guidance, based on ICRP Publication 30 models and committed effective dose equivalents of 20 mSv and 200 mSv, is expressed as numerical workplace measurements and derived first-day bioassay results for large intakes. It is used by facility radiation protection staff and on-call dosimetry support staff during the first few days following an intake.},
doi = {10.1097/01.HP.0000258922.82544.32},
journal = {Health Physics. Operational Radiation Safety, 92(5 Supp. 2):S123 - S126},
number = 5 Supp. 2,
volume = 92,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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