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Title: Measuring residual stress in glasses and ceramics using instrumented indentation.

Abstract

Instrumented indentation has yielded mixed results when used to measure surface residual stresses in metal films. Relative to metals, many glasses and ceramics have a low modulus-to-yield strength (E/sy) ratio. The advantage of this characteristic for measuring residual stress using instrumented indentation is demonstrated by a series of comparative spherical and conical tip finite element simulations. Two cases are considered: (i) a material with E/s{sub y} = 24-similar to glass and (ii) a material with E/s{sub y} = 120-similar to metal films. In both cases, compressive residual stress shifts the simulated load-displacement response toward increasing hardness, irrespective of tip geometry. This shift is shown to be entirely due to pile up for the ''metal'' case, but primarily due to the direct influence of the residual stress for the ''glass'' case. Hardness changes and load-displacement curve shifts are explained by using the spherical cavity model. Supporting experimental results on stressed glasses are provided.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908710
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-2087J
TRN: US200722%%759
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proposed for publication in the Journal of Materials Research.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CERAMICS; GLASS; HARDNESS; RESIDUAL STRESSES; FILMS; SURFACE PROPERTIES; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD

Citation Formats

Tandon, Rajan, and Buchheit, Thomas E. Measuring residual stress in glasses and ceramics using instrumented indentation.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Tandon, Rajan, & Buchheit, Thomas E. Measuring residual stress in glasses and ceramics using instrumented indentation.. United States.
Tandon, Rajan, and Buchheit, Thomas E. Thu . "Measuring residual stress in glasses and ceramics using instrumented indentation.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_908710,
title = {Measuring residual stress in glasses and ceramics using instrumented indentation.},
author = {Tandon, Rajan and Buchheit, Thomas E.},
abstractNote = {Instrumented indentation has yielded mixed results when used to measure surface residual stresses in metal films. Relative to metals, many glasses and ceramics have a low modulus-to-yield strength (E/sy) ratio. The advantage of this characteristic for measuring residual stress using instrumented indentation is demonstrated by a series of comparative spherical and conical tip finite element simulations. Two cases are considered: (i) a material with E/s{sub y} = 24-similar to glass and (ii) a material with E/s{sub y} = 120-similar to metal films. In both cases, compressive residual stress shifts the simulated load-displacement response toward increasing hardness, irrespective of tip geometry. This shift is shown to be entirely due to pile up for the ''metal'' case, but primarily due to the direct influence of the residual stress for the ''glass'' case. Hardness changes and load-displacement curve shifts are explained by using the spherical cavity model. Supporting experimental results on stressed glasses are provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {Proposed for publication in the Journal of Materials Research.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}