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Title: Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system

Abstract

In the Fermilab Beam Loss Monitor System, inputs from ion chambers are integrated for a short period of time, digitized and processed to create the accelerator abort request signals. The accelerator power supplies employing 3-phase 60Hz AC cause noise at various harmonics on our inputs which must be eliminated for monitoring purposes. During accelerator ramping, both the sampling frequency and the amplitudes of the noise components change. As such, traditional digital filtering can partially reduce certain noise components but not all. A nontraditional algorithm was developed in our work to eliminate remaining ripples. The sequencing in the FPGA firmware is conducted by a micro-sequencer core we developed: the Enclosed Loop Micro-Sequencer (ELMS). The unique feature of the ELMS is that it supports the ''FOR'' loops with pre-defined iterations at the machine code level, which provides programming convenience and avoids many micro-complexities from the beginning.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
908364
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-07-095-E FERMILAB-CONF-07-095-E
TRN: US0703672
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at 15th IEEE Real Time Conference 2007 (RT 07), Batavia, Illinois, 29 Apr - 4 May 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ALGORITHMS; AMPLITUDES; FERMILAB; HARMONICS; MONITORING; MONITORS; POWER SUPPLIES; PROGRAMMING; SAMPLING; Accelerators

Citation Formats

Wu, Jinyuan, Baumbaugh, Alan, Drennan, Craig, Thurman-Keup, Randy, Lewis, Jonathan, Shi, Zonghan, and /Fermilab. Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Wu, Jinyuan, Baumbaugh, Alan, Drennan, Craig, Thurman-Keup, Randy, Lewis, Jonathan, Shi, Zonghan, & /Fermilab. Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system. United States.
Wu, Jinyuan, Baumbaugh, Alan, Drennan, Craig, Thurman-Keup, Randy, Lewis, Jonathan, Shi, Zonghan, and /Fermilab. Tue . "Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908364.
@article{osti_908364,
title = {Readout process and noise elimination firmware for the Fermilab beam loss system},
author = {Wu, Jinyuan and Baumbaugh, Alan and Drennan, Craig and Thurman-Keup, Randy and Lewis, Jonathan and Shi, Zonghan and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {In the Fermilab Beam Loss Monitor System, inputs from ion chambers are integrated for a short period of time, digitized and processed to create the accelerator abort request signals. The accelerator power supplies employing 3-phase 60Hz AC cause noise at various harmonics on our inputs which must be eliminated for monitoring purposes. During accelerator ramping, both the sampling frequency and the amplitudes of the noise components change. As such, traditional digital filtering can partially reduce certain noise components but not all. A nontraditional algorithm was developed in our work to eliminate remaining ripples. The sequencing in the FPGA firmware is conducted by a micro-sequencer core we developed: the Enclosed Loop Micro-Sequencer (ELMS). The unique feature of the ELMS is that it supports the ''FOR'' loops with pre-defined iterations at the machine code level, which provides programming convenience and avoids many micro-complexities from the beginning.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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