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Title: CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS

Abstract

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been defueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D&D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued inmore » 2009.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Environmental Management (EM)
OSTI Identifier:
908291
Report Number(s):
HNF-32418-FP Rev 0
TRN: US0703656
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC06-96RL13200
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: THE 11TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION & RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT ASME TECH INSTITUTE OF ROYAL FLEMISH SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS BELGIAN NUCLEAR SOCIETY 09/02/2007 THRU 09/06/2007 BURGES BELGIUM
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CLOSURES; DEACTIVATION; DECOMMISSIONING; DECONTAMINATION; ENGINEERS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; FAST REACTORS; FFTF REACTOR; MAINTENANCE; RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT; SODIUM; STORAGE

Citation Formats

LESPERANCE, C.P. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
LESPERANCE, C.P. CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS. United States.
LESPERANCE, C.P. Wed . "CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/908291.
@article{osti_908291,
title = {CLOSURE OF THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) CURRENT STATUS & FUTURE PLANS},
author = {LESPERANCE, C.P.},
abstractNote = {The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been defueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodium has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D&D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Wed May 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Deactivation activities are currently in progress at the Fast Flux Test Facility. These deactivation activities are intended to remove most hazardous materials and prepare the facility for final disposition. The two major hazards to be removed are the nuclear fuel and the alkali metal (most sodium) coolant. The fuel and coolant removal activities are proceeding well and are expected to complete in 2006. Plant systems are being shut down as allowed by completion of various fuel and coolant removal actions. A Decommissioning Environmental Impact Statement is in progress to evaluate a range of potential final disposition end states.
  • In 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) decided to shut down the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) due to lack of national missions that justified the annual operating budget of approximately $88M/year. The initial vision was to ''deactive'' the facility to an industrially and radiologically safe condition to allow long-term, minimal surveillance storage until approximately 2045. This approach would minimize near term cash flow and allow the radioactive decay of activated components. The final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) would then be performed using then-current methodology in a safe and efficient manner. the philosophy has now changed tomore » close coupling the initial deactivation with final D and D. This paper presents the status of the facility and focuses on the future challenge of sodium removal.« less
  • The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium cooled fast reactor designed and constructed in the 1970's. The original purpose of the facility was to develop and test advanced fuels and materials for the liquid metal fast breeder reactor program. The facility operated very successfully from 1982 through 1992, fulfilling its original mission as well as other identified missions. However, in 1993 the Department of Energy concluded that there was no longer a need for the FFTF and thus ordered that it be shut down. Following eight years of additional study of potential new missions, the finalmore » decision to shut down the facility was made in 2001. (During this eight year period the plant was maintained in a condition to allow safe and efficient shut down or restart). The complete closure of the FFTF consists of the following phases: - Deactivation - removal/stabilization of hazards to allow long-term storage (2001-2009); - Surveillance and maintenance - minimum cost compliant storage (2010-2015); - Decontamination and decommissioning (2016-2024). All of the FFTF fuel has been removed from the site except the sodium-bonded fuel that is destined for transportation to Idaho National Laboratory for final disposition. The sodium-bonded fuel had metallic sodium inside of the fuel pin to increase the heat transfer from the fuel pellet to the clad in order to reduce pellet centerline temperature. Three hundred and seventy-six (376) fuel assemblies have been washed (sodium removed) and transferred to storage at other Hanford locations. The majority of the spent fuel is stored in interim storage casks designed for a 50 year storage life, holding seven assemblies each. All sodium systems have been drained and the sodium stored under an inert gas blanket at ambient temperature in a Sodium Storage Facility at the FFTF site. This facility consists of four large tanks and associated piping. The main contaminants are sodium-22, cesium-137 and tritium. The sodium-potassium (NaK) that was used as an intermediate cooling fluid in several FFTF systems has been drained and removed or flushed to sodium systems where it became mixed with the sodium. The in-containment hot cell has minimal sodium contamination, is currently inerted with argon and is being used for loading of the T-3 transportation cask with the sodium-bonded fuel for transportation to Idaho National Laboratory. The majority of the fuel handling machines are still operational and being used for loading the sodium-bonded fuel into the T-3 casks. This equipment will be shut down immediately following completion of shipment of the sodium-bonded fuel. The majority of hotel systems are still operating. Four of the eight 400-ton chillers have been shut down and four of the cooling towers have been shut down. The argon system is operational and supplying gas for sodium systems cover gas, in-containment hot cell atmosphere and fuel handling systems. The nitrogen system remains in service supplying cover gas to the demineralized water system and fire suppression systems. Eleven of the facilities nineteen transformers containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been removed and significant re-routing of power has been performed to support the long term minimum cost surveillance mode. Future plans include the complete deactivation, the long-term surveillance and maintenance, the sodium disposition and the decontamination and decommissioning The most complex and costly activity during the decontamination and decommissioning phase will be the removal of the 'residual sodium' in the sodium systems. It was impractical to remove the residual sodium during the systems draining evolution. It is estimated that approximately 24,000 liters (6,400 gallons) remain within the systems. The complexity of design of the FFTF exceeds any sodium facility in the United States in which sodium removal has occurred. There are a total of 21 miles of sodium piping in the FFTF as well as three large vessels (the reactor vessel and two spent fuel pool vessels) that will require partial disassembly and drilling in order react/remove remaining sodium.« less
  • The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400 MWt sodium-cooled fast reactor situated on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in the southeastern portion of Washington State. DOE issued the final order to shut down the facility in 2001, when it was concluded that there was no longer a need for FFTF. Deactivation activities are in progress to remove or stabilize major hazards and deactivate systems to achieve end points documented in the project baseline. The reactor has been de-fueled, and approximately 97% of the fuel has been removed from the facility. Approximately 97% of the sodiummore » has been drained from the plant's systems and placed into an on-site Sodium Storage Facility. The residual sodium will be kept frozen under a blanket of inert gas until it is removed later as part of the facility's decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). Plant systems have been shut down and placed in a low-risk state to minimize requirements for surveillance and maintenance. D and D work cannot begin until an Environmental Impact Statement has been prepared to evaluate various end state options and to provide a basis for selecting one of the options. The Environmental Impact Statement is expected to be issued in 2009. (authors)« less
  • No abstract prepared.